Definition of Armor. Meaning of Armor. Synonyms of Armor

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Definition of Armor

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Armor-bearer
Armor-bearer Ar"mor-bear`er, n. One who carries the armor or arms of another; an armiger. --Judg. ix. 54.
Armored
Armored Ar"mored, a. Clad with armor.
armored concrete steel
Ferro-concrete Fer"ro-con"crete, n. (Arch. & Engin.) Concrete strengthened by a core or foundation skeleton of iron or steel bars, strips, etc. Floors, columns, piles, water pipes, etc., have been successfully made of it. Called also armored concrete steel, and re["e]nforced concrete.
Armorer
Armorer Ar"mor*er, n. [OE. armurer, armerer, fr. F. armurter, fr. armure armor.] 1. One who makes or repairs armor or arms. 2. Formerly, one who had care of the arms and armor of a knight, and who dressed him in armor. --Shak. 3. One who has the care of arms and armor, cleans or repairs them, etc.
Armorial
Armorial Ar*mo"ri*al, a. [F. armorial, fr. armoiries arms, coats of arms, for armoieries, fr. OF. armoier to paint arms, coats of arms, fr. armes, fr. L. arma. See Arms, Armory.] Belonging to armor, or to the heraldic arms or escutcheon of a family. Figures with armorial signs of race and birth. --Wordsworth. Armorial bearings. See Arms, 4.
Armorial bearings
Armorial Ar*mo"ri*al, a. [F. armorial, fr. armoiries arms, coats of arms, for armoieries, fr. OF. armoier to paint arms, coats of arms, fr. armes, fr. L. arma. See Arms, Armory.] Belonging to armor, or to the heraldic arms or escutcheon of a family. Figures with armorial signs of race and birth. --Wordsworth. Armorial bearings. See Arms, 4.
Armoric
Armoric Ar*mor"ic, Armorican Ar*mor"i*can, a. [L. Armoricus, fr. Celtic ar on, at + mor sea.] Of or pertaining to the northwestern part of France (formerly called Armorica, now Bretagne or Brittany), or to its people. -- n. The language of the Armoricans, a Celtic dialect which has remained to the present times.
Armorican
Armoric Ar*mor"ic, Armorican Ar*mor"i*can, a. [L. Armoricus, fr. Celtic ar on, at + mor sea.] Of or pertaining to the northwestern part of France (formerly called Armorica, now Bretagne or Brittany), or to its people. -- n. The language of the Armoricans, a Celtic dialect which has remained to the present times.
Armorican
Armorican Ar*mor"i*can, n. A native of Armorica.
Armories
Armory Ar"mo*ry, n.; pl. Armories. [OF. armaire, armarie, F. armoire, fr. L. armarium place for keeping arms; but confused with F. armoiries. See Armorial, Ambry.] 1. A place where arms and instruments of war are deposited for safe keeping. 2. Armor; defensive and offensive arms. Celestial armory, shields, helms, and spears. --Milton. 3. A manufactory of arms, as rifles, muskets, pistols, bayonets, swords. [U.S.] 4. Ensigns armorial; armorial bearings. --Spenser. 5. That branch of heraldry which treats of coat armor. The science of heraldry, or, more justly speaking, armory, which is but one branch of heraldry, is, without doubt, of very ancient origin. --Cussans.
Armorist
Armorist Ar"mor*ist, n. [F. armoriste.] One skilled in coat armor or heraldry. --Cussans.
Armor-plated
Armor-plated Ar"mor-plat`ed, a. Covered with defensive plates of metal, as a ship of war; steel-clad. This day will be launched . . . the first armor-plated steam frigate in the possession of Great Britain. --Times (Dec. 29, 1860).
Armory
Armory Ar"mo*ry, n.; pl. Armories. [OF. armaire, armarie, F. armoire, fr. L. armarium place for keeping arms; but confused with F. armoiries. See Armorial, Ambry.] 1. A place where arms and instruments of war are deposited for safe keeping. 2. Armor; defensive and offensive arms. Celestial armory, shields, helms, and spears. --Milton. 3. A manufactory of arms, as rifles, muskets, pistols, bayonets, swords. [U.S.] 4. Ensigns armorial; armorial bearings. --Spenser. 5. That branch of heraldry which treats of coat armor. The science of heraldry, or, more justly speaking, armory, which is but one branch of heraldry, is, without doubt, of very ancient origin. --Cussans.
Chelopus marmoratus
Ellachick El"la*chick, n. [Native Indian name.] (Zo["o]l.) A fresh-water tortoise (Chelopus marmoratus) of California; -- used as food.
F marmorata
Tiger Ti"ger, n. [OE. tigre, F. tigre, L. tigris, Gr. ti`gris; probably of Persian origin; cf. Zend tighra pointed, tighri an arrow, Per. t[=i]r; perhaps akin to E. stick, v.t.; -- probably so named from its quickness.] 1. A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger. 2. Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person. As for heinous tiger, Tamora. --Shak. 3. A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress. --Dickens. 4. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering; as, three cheers and a tiger. [Colloq. U. S.] 5. A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar. American tiger. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The puma. (b) The jaguar. Clouded tiger (Zo["o]l.), a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or F. marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger. Mexican tiger (Zo["o]l.), the jaguar. Tiger beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelid[ae]. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly. Tiger bittern. (Zo["o]l.) See Sun bittern, under Sun. Tiger cat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger. Tiger flower (Bot.), an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as T. conchiflora, T. grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger. Tiger grass (Bot.), a low East Indian fan palm (Cham[ae]rops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives. --J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants). Tiger lily. (Bot.) See under Lily. Tiger moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiad[ae] which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larv[ae] are called woolly bears. Tiger shark (Zo["o]l.), a voracious shark (Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark. Tiger shell (Zo["o]l.), a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypr[ae]a tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie. Tiger wolf (Zo["o]l.), the spotted hyena (Hy[ae]na crocuta). Tiger wood, the variegated heartwood of a tree (Mach[ae]rium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
Felis marmorata
Rimau dahan Ri"mau da"han [From the native Oriental name.] (Zo["o]l.) The clouded tiger cat (Felis marmorata) of Southern Asia and the East Indies.
Marmoraceous
Marmoraceous Mar`mo*ra"ceous, a. [L. marmor marble. See Marble.] Pertaining to, or like, marble.
Marmorate
Marmorate Mar"mo*rate, Marmorated Mar"mo*ra`ted, a. [L. marmoratus, p. p. of marmorate to overlay with marble, fr. marmor marble.] Variegated like marble; covered or overlaid with marble. [R.]
Marmorated
Marmorate Mar"mo*rate, Marmorated Mar"mo*ra`ted, a. [L. marmoratus, p. p. of marmorate to overlay with marble, fr. marmor marble.] Variegated like marble; covered or overlaid with marble. [R.]
Marmoration
Marmoration Mar`mo*ra"tion, n. [L. marmoratio.] A covering or incrusting with marble; a casing of marble; a variegating so as to resemble marble. [R.]
Marmoratum opus
Marmoratum opus Mar`mo*ra`tum o"pus [L. See Marmorate, and Opus.] (Arch.) A kind of hard finish for plasterwork, made of plaster of Paris and marble dust, and capable of taking a high polish.
Marmorosis
Marmorosis Mar`mo*ro"sis, n. [NL.] (Geol.) The metamorphism of limestone, that is, its conversion into marble. --Geikie.
N Armoracia
Horse-radish Horse"-rad`ish, n. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Nasturtium (N. Armoracia), allied to scurvy grass, having a root of a pungent taste, much used, when grated, as a condiment and in medicine. --Gray. Horse-radish tree. (Bot.) See Moringa.
Scorpaenichthys marmoratus
Sculpin Scul"pin, n. [Written also skulpin.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of marine cottoid fishes of the genus Cottus, or Acanthocottus, having a large head armed with sharp spines, and a broad mouth. They are generally mottled with yellow, brown, and black. Several species are found on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and America. (b) A large cottoid market fish of California (Scorp[ae]nichthys marmoratus); -- called also bighead, cabezon, scorpion, salpa. (c) The dragonet, or yellow sculpin, of Europe (Callionymus lura). Note: The name is also applied to other related California species. Deep-water sculpin, the sea raven.
Splint armor
Splint Splint, n. [Akin to D. splinter,G. splinter, splitter, Dan. splint, Sw. splint a kind of spike, a forelock (in nautical use), Sw. splintato splint, splinter, Dan. splinte, and E. split. See Split, v. t., and cf. Splent.] 1. A piece split off; a splinter. 2. (Surg.) A thin piece of wood, or other substance, used to keep in place, or protect, an injured part, especially a broken bone when set. 3. (Anat.) A splint bone. 4. (Far.) A disease affecting the splint bones, as a callosity or hard excrescence. 5. (Anc. Armor.) One of the small plates of metal used in making splint armor. See Splint armor, below. The knees and feet were defended by splints, or thin plates of steel. --Sir. W. Scott. 6. Splint, or splent, coal. See Splent coal, under Splent. Splint armor,a kind of ancient armor formed of thin plates of metal, usually overlapping each other and allowing the limbs to move freely. Splint bone (Anat.), one of the rudimentary, splintlike metacarpal or metatarsal bones on either side of the cannon bone in the limbs of the horse and allied animals. Splint coal. See Splent coal, under Splent.
Submarine armor
Submarine Sub`ma*rine", a. Being, acting, or growing, under water in the sea; as, submarine navigators; submarine plants. Submarine armor, a waterproof dress of strong material, having a helmet into which air for breathing is pumped through a tube leading from above the surface to enable a diver to remain under water. Submarine cable. See Telegraph cable, under Telegraph. Submarine mine. See Torpedo, 2 (a) .
Top-armor
Top-armor Top"-ar`mor, n. (Naut.) A top railing supported by stanchions and equipped with netting.

Meaning of Armor from wikipedia

- Armour (British English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted...
- ARMOR is the professional journal of the U.S. Army’s Armor Branch, published by the Chief of Armor at Fort Benning, Georgia, training center for the Army's...
- Belt armor is a layer of heavy metal armor plated onto or within the outer hulls of warships, typically on battleships, battlecruisers and cruisers, and...
- either body armor or vehicle armor. From the 1860s to 1950s, a major application of armor-piercing projectiles was to defeat the thick armor carried on...
- Petals for Armor is the debut solo studio album by American singer-songwriter and Paramore frontwoman Hayley Williams. It was released on May 8, 2020...
- Slat armor (or slat armour, see spelling differences), also known as bar armor, cage armor and standoff armor, is a type of vehicle armor designed to protect...
- Iron Man's armor is a fictional powered exoskeleton appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics and is worn by comic book superhero Tony...
- Body armor, also known as body armour, personal armor/armour, or a suit/coat of armour, is protective clothing designed to absorb or deflect physical attacks...
- Ceramic armor is armor used by armored vehicles and in personal armor to resist projectile penetration through high hardness and compressive strength...
- Armored Division 1st Cavalry Division 33rd Armor Regiment 34th Armor Regiment 35th Armor Regiment 37th Armor Regiment 63rd Armor Regiment 64th Armor Regiment...
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