Definition of Antiscorbutical. Meaning of Antiscorbutical. Synonyms of Antiscorbutical

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Antiscorbutical. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Antiscorbutical and, of course, Antiscorbutical synonyms and on the right images related to the word Antiscorbutical.

Definition of Antiscorbutical

Antiscorbutical
Antiscorbutical An`ti*scor*bu"tic*al, a. (Med.) Antiscorbutic.

Meaning of Antiscorbutical from wikipedia

- practical antiscorbutic among civilian whalers and explorers in the Arctic. Even cooking fresh meat did not entirely destroy its antiscorbutic properties...
- scurvy. For this, the British Admiralty awarded him a medal. The name antiscorbutic was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries for foods known...
- via chemical synthesis but has no significant biological role. The antiscorbutic properties of certain foods were demonstrated in the 18th century by...
- epidermis containing up to 38 mg per 100 grams (3.5 oz). It was used as an antiscorbutic by British Arctic explorers. Blubber is also a source of vitamin D....
- ISBN 978-0789018441. Stubbs, Brett J. (June 2003). "Captain Cook's beer: the antiscorbutic use of malt and beer in late 18th century sea voyages". Asia Pacific...
- from scurvy, which led Bligh to apply his own medicinal and dietary antiscorbutic remedies to the entire ship's company. By now, Huggan was almost incapacitated...
- Company, had recommended the consumption of citrus fruit (it has an antiscorbutic effect) from the 17th century, but their use did not become widespread...
- bunch") or a similar source. Brooklime was one of three traditional antiscorbutic herbs (alongside scurvy gr**** and watercress), used in purported remedies...
- antiscorbutic factor, known as vitamin C. After Walter Norman Haworth had determined the structure of vitamin C, and in honour of its antiscorbutic properties...
- 17th century in England, it had been known that citrus fruit had an antiscorbutic effect, when John Woodall (1570–1643), an English military surgeon of...
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