Definition of Antin. Meaning of Antin. Synonyms of Antin

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Definition of Antin

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Adamantine
Adamantine Ad`a*man"tine, a. [L. adamantinus, Gr. ?.] 1. Made of adamant, or having the qualities of adamant; incapable of being broken, dissolved, or penetrated; as, adamantine bonds or chains. 2. (Min.) Like the diamond in hardness or luster.
alantin
Inulin In"u*lin, n. [From NL. Inula Helenium, the elecampane: cf. F. inuline.] (Chem.) A substance of very wide occurrence. It is found dissolved in the sap of the roots and rhizomes of many composite and other plants, as Inula, Helianthus, Campanula, etc., and is extracted by solution as a tasteless, white, semicrystalline substance, resembling starch, with which it is isomeric. It is intermediate in nature between starch and sugar. Called also dahlin, helenin, alantin, etc.
Alantin
Alantin A*lan"tin, n. [G. alant elecampane, the Inula helenium of Linn[ae]us.] (Chem.) See Inulin.
Alloxantin
Alloxantin Al`lox*an"tin, n. (Chem.) A substance produced by acting upon uric with warm and very dilute nitric acid.
Andantino
Andantino An`dan*ti"no, a. [It., dim. of andante.] (Mus.) Rather quicker than andante; between that allegretto. Note: Some, taking andante in its original sense of ``going,' and andantino as its diminutive, or ``less going,' define the latter as slower than andante.
Antinephritic
Antinephritic An`ti*ne*phrit"ic, a. (Med.) Counteracting, or deemed of use in, diseases of the kidneys. -- n. An antinephritic remedy.
Antinomian
Antinomian An`ti*no"mi*an, a. [See Antimony.] Of or pertaining to the Antinomians; opposed to the doctrine that the moral law is obligatory.
Antinomian
Antinomian An`ti*no"mi*an, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One who maintains that, under the gospel dispensation, the moral law is of no use or obligation, but that faith alone is necessary to salvation. The sect of Antinomians originated with John Agricola, in Germany, about the year 1535. --Mosheim.
Antinomianism
Antinomianism An`ti*no"mi*an*ism, n. The tenets or practice of Antinomians. --South.
Antinomies
Antinomy An*tin"o*my (?; 277), n.; pl. Antinomies. [L. antinomia, Gr. ?; ? against + ? law.] 1. Opposition of one law or rule to another law or rule. Different commentators have deduced from it the very opposite doctrines. In some instances this apparent antinomy is doubtful. --De Quincey. 2. An opposing law or rule of any kind. As it were by his own antinomy, or counterstatute. --Milton. 3. (Metaph.) A contradiction or incompatibility of thought or language; -- in the Kantian philosophy, such a contradiction as arises from the attempt to apply to the ideas of the reason, relations or attributes which are appropriate only to the facts or the concepts of experience.
Antinomist
Antinomist An*tin"o*mist, n. An Antinomian. [R.] --Bp. Sanderson.
Antinomy
Antinomy An*tin"o*my (?; 277), n.; pl. Antinomies. [L. antinomia, Gr. ?; ? against + ? law.] 1. Opposition of one law or rule to another law or rule. Different commentators have deduced from it the very opposite doctrines. In some instances this apparent antinomy is doubtful. --De Quincey. 2. An opposing law or rule of any kind. As it were by his own antinomy, or counterstatute. --Milton. 3. (Metaph.) A contradiction or incompatibility of thought or language; -- in the Kantian philosophy, such a contradiction as arises from the attempt to apply to the ideas of the reason, relations or attributes which are appropriate only to the facts or the concepts of experience.
Awanting
Awanting A*want"ing, a. [Pref. a- + wanting.] Missing; wanting. [Prov. Scot. & Eng.] --Sir W. Hamilton.
Bantingism
Bantingism Ban"ting*ism, n. A method of reducing corpulence by avoiding food containing much farinaceous, saccharine, or oily matter; -- so called from William Banting of London.
Barkantine
Barkantine Bark"an*tine, n. Same as Barkentine.
barkantine
Barkentine Bark"en*tine, n. [See Bark, n., a vessel.] (Naut.) A threemasted vessel, having the foremast square-rigged, and the others schooner-rigged. [Spelled also barquentine, barkantine, etc.] See Illust. in Append.
Bizantine
Bizantine Biz"an*tine See Byzantine.
Brabantine
Brabantine Bra*bant"ine, a. Pertaining to Brabant, an ancient province of the Netherlands.
brigantine
Brigandine Brig"an*dine, n. [F. brigandine (cf. It. brigantina), fr. OF. brigant. See Brigand.] A coast of armor for the body, consisting of scales or plates, sometimes overlapping each other, generally of metal, and sewed to linen or other material. It was worn in the Middle Ages. [Written also brigantine.] --Jer. xlvi. 4. Then put on all thy gorgeous arms, thy helmet, And brigandine of brass. --Milton.
Brigantine
Brigantine Brig"an*tine, n. [F. brigantin, fr. It. brigantino, originally, a practical vessel. See Brigand, and cf. Brig] 1. A practical vessel. [Obs.] 2. A two-masted, square-rigged vessel, differing from a brig in that she does not carry a square mainsail. 3. See Brigandine.
Brilliantine
Brilliantine Bril"lian*tine, n. [F. brillantine. See lst Brilliant.] 1. An oily composition used to make the hair glossy. 2. A dress fabric having a glossy finish on both sides, resembling alpaca but of superior quality.
Byzantine
Byzant Byz"ant, Byzantine Byz"an*tine (-[a^]n"t[imac]n) n.[OE. besant, besaunt, F. besant, fr. LL. Byzantius, Byzantinus, fr. Byzantium.] (Numis.) A gold coin, so called from being coined at Byzantium. See Bezant.
Byzantine
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [ Written also Bizantine.] Byzantine church, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under Greek. Byzantine empire, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453. Byzantine historians, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc. Byzantine style (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire. Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture.
Byzantine church
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [ Written also Bizantine.] Byzantine church, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under Greek. Byzantine empire, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453. Byzantine historians, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc. Byzantine style (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire. Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture.
Byzantine Church
Greek Greek, a. [AS. grec, L. Graecus, Gr. ?: cf. F. grec. Cf. Grecian.] Of or pertaining to Greece or the Greeks; Grecian. Greek calends. See under Calends. Greek Church (Eccl. Hist.), the Eastern Church; that part of Christendom which separated from the Roman or Western Church in the ninth century. It comprises the great bulk of the Christian population of Russia (of which this is the established church), Greece, Moldavia, and Wallachia. The Greek Church is governed by patriarchs and is called also the Byzantine Church. Greek cross. See Illust. (10) Of Cross. Greek Empire. See Byzantine Empire. Greek fire, a combustible composition which burns under water, the constituents of which are supposed to be asphalt, with niter and sulphur. --Ure. Greek rose, the flower campion.
Byzantine empire
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [ Written also Bizantine.] Byzantine church, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under Greek. Byzantine empire, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453. Byzantine historians, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc. Byzantine style (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire. Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture.
Byzantine historians
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [ Written also Bizantine.] Byzantine church, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under Greek. Byzantine empire, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453. Byzantine historians, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc. Byzantine style (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire. Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture.
Byzantine style
Byzantine By*zan"tine (b[i^]*z[a^]n"t[i^]n), a. Of or pertaining to Byzantium. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. [ Written also Bizantine.] Byzantine church, the Eastern or Greek church, as distinguished from the Western or Roman or Latin church. See under Greek. Byzantine empire, the Eastern Roman or Greek empire from a. d. 364 or a. d. 395 to the capture of Constantinople by the Turks, a. d. 1453. Byzantine historians, historians and writers (Zonaras, Procopius, etc.) who lived in the Byzantine empire. --P. Cyc. Byzantine style (Arch.), a style of architecture developed in the Byzantine empire. Note: Its leading forms are the round arch, the dome, the pillar, the circle, and the cross. The capitals of the pillars are of endless variety, and full of invention. The mosque of St. Sophia, Constantinople, and the church of St. Mark, Venice, are prominent examples of Byzantine architecture.
Cantine
Cantine Can*tine", n. See Canteen.
Canting
Cant Cant, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Canted; p. pr. & vb. n. Canting.] 1. To incline; to set at an angle; to tilt over; to tip upon the edge; as, to cant a cask; to cant a ship. 2. To give a sudden turn or new direction to; as, to cant round a stick of timber; to cant a football. 3. To cut off an angle from, as from a square piece of timber, or from the head of a bolt.

Meaning of Antin from wikipedia

- brother of fellow actor Neil Antin, ****cat Dolls founder Robin Antin, and celebrity hairstylist Jonathan Antin. Antin was a co-lead in the 1982 film...
- Robin Antin (born July 6, 1961) is an American actress, entrepreneur, singer, dancer, c****ographer and clothing designer. In 1995, she founded the modern...
- Jonathan Antin is the former owner of two Los Angeles hair salons, Jonathan Salon West Hollywood and Jonathan Salon Beverly Hills. His life as an entrepreneur...
- Mary Antin (born Maryashe Antin; June 13, 1881 – May 15, 1949) was an American author and immigration rights activist. She is best known for her 1912 autobiography...
- Antin may refer to: Antin, Hautes-Pyrénées, a commune in the Hautes-Pyrénées department in France Antin, Croatia, a village in eastern Croatia Ukrainian...
- Antin Infrastructure Partners is a private equity firm focused on infrastructure investment, with offices in Paris, London and Luxembourg. Antin was founded...
- Antin in 1995 as a burlesque troupe. At the suggestion of Jimmy Iovine, Antin decided to take the burlesque troupe mainstream as a pop group. Antin negotiated...
- Eleanor Antin (née Fineman; February 27, 1935) is an American performance artist, film-maker, installation artist, conceptual artist and feminist artist...
- The duchy of Antin was a French duchy created in 1711 by the promotion of the marquisate of Antin (held by the Pardaillan de Gondrin family) into a "duché-pairie"...
- David Abram Antin (February 1, 1932 – October 11, 2016) was an American poet, critic and performance artist. Antin was born in New York City in 1932. After...
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