Definition of Andra. Meaning of Andra. Synonyms of Andra

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Definition of Andra

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Calandra or Sitophilus oryzae
Rice Rice, n. [F. riz (cf. Pr. ris, It. riso), L. oryza, Gr. ???, ???, probably from the Persian; cf. OPers. br[=i]zi, akin to Skr. vr[=i]hi; or perh. akin to E. rye. Cf. Rye.] (Bot.) A well-known cereal grass (Oryza sativa) and its seed. This plant is extensively cultivated in warm climates, and the grain forms a large portion of the food of the inhabitants. In America it grows chiefly on low, moist land, which can be overflowed. Ant rice. (Bot.) See under Ant. French rice. (Bot.) See Amelcorn. Indian rice., a tall reedlike water grass (Zizania aquatica), bearing panicles of a long, slender grain, much used for food by North American Indians. It is common in shallow water in the Northern States. Called also water oat, Canadian wild rice, etc. Mountain rice, any species of an American genus (Oryzopsis) of grasses, somewhat resembling rice. Rice bunting. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Ricebird. Rice hen (Zo["o]l.), the Florida gallinule. Rice mouse (Zo["o]l.), a large dark-colored field mouse (Calomys palistris) of the Southern United States. Rice paper, a kind of thin, delicate paper, brought from China, -- used for painting upon, and for the manufacture of fancy articles. It is made by cutting the pith of a large herb (Fatsia papyrifera, related to the ginseng) into one roll or sheet, which is flattened out under pressure. Called also pith paper. Rice troupial (Zo["o]l.), the bobolink. Rice water, a drink for invalids made by boiling a small quantity of rice in water. Rice-water discharge (Med.), a liquid, resembling rice water in appearance, which is vomited, and discharged from the bowels, in cholera. Rice weevil (Zo["o]l.), a small beetle (Calandra, or Sitophilus, oryz[ae]) which destroys rice, wheat, and Indian corn by eating out the interior; -- called also black weevil.
Calandra palmarum
Grugru worm Gru"gru worm" (Zo["o]l.) The larva or grub of a large South American beetle (Calandra palmarum), which lives in the pith of palm trees and sugar cane. It is eaten by the natives, and esteemed a delicacy.
Calliandra latifolia
Horsewood Horse"wood`, n. (Bot.) A West Indian tree (Calliandra latifolia) with showy, crimson blossoms.
Calliandra purpurea
Soldierwood Sol"dier*wood`, n. (Bot.) A showy leguminous plant (Calliandra purpurea) of the West Indies. The flowers have long tassels of purple stamens.
Cassandra calyculata
Leather Leath"er, n. [OE. lether, AS. le?er; akin to D. leder, le[^e]r, G. leder, OHG. ledar, Icel. le?r, Sw. l["a]der, Dan. l[ae]der.] 1. The skin of an animal, or some part of such skin, tanned, tawed, or otherwise dressed for use; also, dressed hides, collectively. 2. The skin. [Ironical or Sportive] Note: Leather is much used adjectively in the sense of made of, relating to, or like, leather. Leather board, an imitation of sole leather, made of leather scraps, rags, paper, etc. Leather carp (Zo["o]l.), a variety of carp in which the scales are all, or nearly all, absent. See Illust. under Carp. Leather jacket. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A California carangoid fish (Oligoplites saurus). (b) A trigger fish (Balistes Carolinensis). Leather flower (Bot.), a climbing plant (Clematis Viorna) of the Middle and Southern States having thick, leathery sepals of a purplish color. Leather leaf (Bot.), a low shrub (Cassandra calyculata), growing in Northern swamps, and having evergreen, coriaceous, scurfy leaves. Leather plant (Bot.), one or more New Zealand plants of the composite genus Celmisia, which have white or buff tomentose leaves. Leather turtle. (Zo["o]l.) See Leatherback. Vegetable leather. (a) An imitation of leather made of cotton waste. (b) Linen cloth coated with India rubber. --Ure.
Ceiba pentandra
Kapok Ka*pok", n. [Prob. fr. the native name.] (Bot.) A silky wool derived from the seeds of Ceiba pentandra (syn. Eriodendron anfractuosum), a bombaceous tree of the East and West Indies.
Dimorphandra excelsa
Mora Mo"ra, n. (Bot.) A leguminous tree of Guiana and Trinidad (Dimorphandra excelsa); also, its timber, used in shipbuilding and making furniture.
Dryandra
Dryandra Dry*an"dra, n. [NL. Named after J. Dryander.] (Bot.) A genus of shrubs growing in Australia, having beautiful, hard, dry, evergreen leaves.
Hemisalamandra cristata
Triton Tri"ton, n. [L., fr. Gr.?.] (Gr. Myth.) A fabled sea demigod, the son of Neptune and Amphitrite, and the trumpeter of Neptune. He is represented by poets and painters as having the upper part of his body like that of a man, and the lower part like that of a fish. He often has a trumpet made of a shell. Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea, Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. --Wordsworth. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of many species of marine gastropods belonging to Triton and allied genera, having a stout spiral shell, often handsomely colored and ornamented with prominent varices. Some of the species are among the largest of all gastropods. Called also trumpet shell, and sea trumpet. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of aquatic salamanders. The common European species are Hemisalamandra cristata, Molge palmata, and M. alpestris, a red-bellied species common in Switzerland. The most common species of the United States is Diemyctylus viridescens. See Illust. under Salamander.
Isonandra
Isonandra I`so*nan"dra, n. [Iso- + Gr. ?, ?, a man, male.] (Bot.) A genus of sapotaceous trees of India. Isonandra Gutta is the principal source of gutta-percha.
Isonandra acuminata
Pachonta Pa*chon"ta, n. (Bot.) A substance resembling gutta-percha, and used to adulterate it, obtained from the East Indian tree Isonandra acuminata.
Isonandra Gutta
Isonandra I`so*nan"dra, n. [Iso- + Gr. ?, ?, a man, male.] (Bot.) A genus of sapotaceous trees of India. Isonandra Gutta is the principal source of gutta-percha.
Isonandra or Dichopsis Gutta
Gutta-percha Gut"ta-per`cha, n. [Malay gutah gum + pertja the tree from which is it procured.] A concrete juice produced by various trees found in the Malayan archipelago, especially by the Isonandra, or Dichopsis, Gutta. It becomes soft, and unpressible at the tamperature of boiling water, and, on cooling, retains its new shape. It dissolves in oils and ethers, but not in water. In many of its properties it resembles caoutchouc, and it is extensively used for many economical purposes. The Mimusops globosa of Guiana also yields this material.
K triandra
Krameria Kra*me"ri*a, n. [NL. So called after the German botanists, J. G. H. & W. H. Kramer.] (Bot.) A genus of spreading shrubs with many stems, from one species of which (K. triandra), found in Peru, rhatany root, used as a medicine, is obtained.
Krameria triandra
Rhatany Rhat"a*ny, Rhatanhy Rhat"an*hy, n. [Sp. ratania, rata[~n]a, Peruv. rata[~n]a.] The powerfully astringent root of a half-shrubby Peruvian plant (Krameria triandra). It is used in medicine and to color port wine. [Written also ratany.] Savanilla rhatany, the root of Krameria Ixina, a native of New Granada.
Mandragora
Mandragora Man*drag"o*ra, n. [L., mandragoras the mandrake.] (Bot.) A genus of plants; the mandrake. See Mandrake, 1.
Mandragora officinarum
Mandrake Man"drake, n. [AS. mandragora, L. mandragoras, fr. Gr. ?: cf. F. mandragore.] 1. (Bot.) A low plant (Mandragora officinarum) of the Nightshade family, having a fleshy root, often forked, and supposed to resemble a man. It was therefore supposed to have animal life, and to cry out when pulled up. All parts of the plant are strongly narcotic. It is found in the Mediterranean region. And shrieks like mandrakes, torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad. --Shak. Note: The mandrake of Scripture was perhaps the same plant, but proof is wanting. 2. (Bot.) The May apple (Podophyllum peltatum). See May apple under May, and Podophyllum. [U.S.]
Mandragorite
Mandragorite Man*drag"o*rite, n. One who habitually intoxicates himself with a narcotic obtained from mandrake.
mandrake
May May, n. [F. Mai, L. Maius; so named in honor of the goddess Maia (Gr. ?), daughter of Atlas and mother of Mercury by Jupiter.] 1. The fifth month of the year, containing thirty-one days. --Chaucer. 2. The early part or springtime of life. His May of youth, and bloom of lustihood. --Shak. 3. (Bot.) The flowers of the hawthorn; -- so called from their time of blossoming; also, the hawthorn. The palm and may make country houses gay. --Nash. Plumes that micked the may. --Tennyson. 4. The merrymaking of May Day. --Tennyson. Italian may (Bot.), a shrubby species of Spir[ae]a (S. hypericifolia) with many clusters of small white flowers along the slender branches. May apple (Bot.), the fruit of an American plant (Podophyllum peltatum). Also, the plant itself (popularly called mandrake), which has two lobed leaves, and bears a single egg-shaped fruit at the forking. The root and leaves, used in medicine, are powerfully drastic. May beetle, May bug (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of large lamellicorn beetles that appear in the winged state in May. They belong to Melolontha, and allied genera. Called also June beetle. May Day, the first day of May; -- celebrated in the rustic parts of England by the crowning of a May queen with a garland, and by dancing about a May pole. May dew, the morning dew of the first day of May, to which magical properties were attributed. May flower (Bot.), a plant that flowers in May; also, its blossom. See Mayflower, in the vocabulary. May fly (Zo["o]l.), any species of Ephemera, and allied genera; -- so called because the mature flies of many species appear in May. See Ephemeral fly, under Ephemeral. May game, any May-day sport. May lady, the queen or lady of May, in old May games. May lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis). May pole. See Maypole in the Vocabulary. May queen, a girl or young woman crowned queen in the sports of May Day. May thorn, the hawthorn.
Mandrake
Mandrake Man"drake, n. [AS. mandragora, L. mandragoras, fr. Gr. ?: cf. F. mandragore.] 1. (Bot.) A low plant (Mandragora officinarum) of the Nightshade family, having a fleshy root, often forked, and supposed to resemble a man. It was therefore supposed to have animal life, and to cry out when pulled up. All parts of the plant are strongly narcotic. It is found in the Mediterranean region. And shrieks like mandrakes, torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad. --Shak. Note: The mandrake of Scripture was perhaps the same plant, but proof is wanting. 2. (Bot.) The May apple (Podophyllum peltatum). See May apple under May, and Podophyllum. [U.S.]
Nectandra Puchury
Pichurim bean Pich"u*rim bean` (Bot.) The seed of a Brazilian lauraceous tree (Nectandra Puchury) of a taste and smell between those of nutmeg and of sassafras, -- sometimes used medicinally. Called also sassafras nut.
Nectandra Rodioei
Bebeeru Be*bee"ru, n. [Written also bibiru.] [Native name.] (Bot.) A tropical South American tree (Nectandra Rodi[oe]i), the bark of which yields the alkaloid bebeerine, and the wood of which is known as green heart.
Nectandra Rodioei
Bebeerine Be*bee"rine, or Bebirine Be*bi"rine (b[-e]*b[=e]"r[i^]n or -r[=e]n), n. (Chem.) An alkaloid got from the bark of the bebeeru, or green heart of Guiana (Nectandra Rodi[oe]i). It is a tonic, antiperiodic, and febrifuge, and is used in medicine as a substitute for quinine. [Written also bibirine.]
Ouvirandra fenestralis
Lattice Lat"tice, n. [OE. latis, F. lattis lathwork, fr. latte lath. See Latten, 1st Lath.] 1. Any work of wood or metal, made by crossing laths, or thin strips, and forming a network; as, the lattice of a window; -- called also latticework. The mother of Sisera looked out at a window, and cried through the lattice. --Judg. v. 28. 2. (Her.) The representation of a piece of latticework used as a bearing, the bands being vertical and horizontal. Lattice bridge, a bridge supported by lattice girders, or latticework trusses. Lattice girder (Arch.), a girder of which the wed consists of diagonal pieces crossing each other in the manner of latticework. Lattice plant (Bot.), an aquatic plant of Madagascar (Ouvirandra fenestralis), whose leaves have interstices between their ribs and cross veins, so as to resemble latticework. A second species is O. Berneriana. The genus is merged in Aponogeton by recent authors.
P decandra
Poke Poke, n. (Bot.) A large North American herb of the genus Phytolacca (P. decandra), bearing dark purple juicy berries; -- called also garget, pigeon berry, pocan, and pokeweed. The root and berries have emetic and purgative properties, and are used in medicine. The young shoots are sometimes eaten as a substitute for asparagus, and the berries are said to be used in Europe to color wine.
Phytolacca decandra
Scoke Scoke, n. (Bot.) Poke (Phytolacca decandra).
Phytolacca decandra
Pocan Po"can, n. (Bot.) The poke (Phytolacca decandra); -- called also pocan bush.

Meaning of Andra from wikipedia

- Look up andra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Andra may refer to: Andra (singer) (born 1986), Romanian singer Andra (musician), Zimbabwean-American...
- C****andra Monique Batie (born December 30, 1984), known professionally as Andra Day, is an American R&B and soul singer, songwriter, and actress. She is...
- "Rise Up" is a single by American singer and songwriter Andra Day. It was released on August 28, 2015, through Warner Music Group, as the second single...
- The discography of American singer Andra Day consists of one studio album, one soundtrack, one video album, two extended plays, and 16 singles as a lead...
- seasons, Wolfsberger AC entered a cooperation with SK St. Andrä, competing under the name WAC/St. Andrä during that period. The team is currently called RZ...
- with the name include: András Ádám-Stolpa (1921–2010), Hungarian tennis player András Adorján (1950–2023), Hungarian writer András Ágoston (21st century)...
- Andra Fuller (born May 29, 1979 in Houston, Texas) is an American actor and stand-up comedian, best known for his role in The CW drama series The L.A...
- the War on Drugs by Johann Hari. Directed by Lee Daniels, the film stars Andra Day in the title role, along with Trevante Rhodes, Garrett Hedlund, Leslie...
- Andra Martin (born Sandra Rehn, July 15, 1935 – May 3, 2022) was an American actress who appeared in many television series and a few movies as a contract...
- Andra Willis (born August 27, 1943) is an American singer best known from television's The Lawrence Welk Show from 1967 to 1969. Born and raised in Danville...