Definition of Amarin. Meaning of Amarin. Synonyms of Amarin

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Definition of Amarin

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Amarine
Amarine Am"a*rine, n. [L. amarus bitter.] (Chem.) A characteristic crystalline substance, obtained from oil of bitter almonds.
Aquamarine
Aquamarine A`qua*ma*rine", n. (Min.) A transparent, pale green variety of beryl, used as a gem. See Beryl.
Convallamarin
Convallamarin Con*val"la*ma`rin, n. [Convallaria + L. amarus bitter.] (Chem.) A white, crystalline, poisonous substance, regarded as a glucoside, extracted from the lily of the valley (Convallaria Majalis). Its taste is first bitter, then sweet.
Dulcamarin
Dulcamarin Dul`ca*ma"rin, n. (Chem.) A glucoside extracted from the bittersweet (Solanum Dulcamara), as a yellow amorphous substance. It probably occasions the compound taste. See Bittersweet, 3 (a) .
Green ultramarine
Ultramarine Ul`tra*ma*rine", n. [Cf. Sp. ultramarino. So called because the lapis lazuli was originally brought from beyond the sea, -- from Asia.] (Chem.) A blue pigment formerly obtained by powdering lapis lazuli, but now produced in large quantities by fusing together silica, alumina, soda, and sulphur, thus forming a glass, colored blue by the sodium polysulphides made in the fusion. Also used adjectively. Green ultramarine, a green pigment obtained as a first product in the manufacture of ultramarine, into which it is changed by subsequent treatment. Ultramarine ash or ashes (Paint.), a pigment which is the residuum of lapis lazuli after the ultramarine has been extracted. It was used by the old masters as a middle or neutral tint for flesh, skies, and draperies, being of a purer and tenderer gray that produced by the mixture of more positive colors. --Fairholt.
Tamarin
Tamarin Tam"a*rin, n. [From the native name in Cayenne.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small squirrel-like South American monkeys of the genus Midas, especially M. ursulus.
Tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Tamarind fish
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Tamarindus Indica
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Ultramarine
Ultramarine Ul`tra*ma*rine", a. [Pref. ultra- + marine.] Situated or being beyond the sea. --Burke.
Ultramarine
Ultramarine Ul`tra*ma*rine", n. [Cf. Sp. ultramarino. So called because the lapis lazuli was originally brought from beyond the sea, -- from Asia.] (Chem.) A blue pigment formerly obtained by powdering lapis lazuli, but now produced in large quantities by fusing together silica, alumina, soda, and sulphur, thus forming a glass, colored blue by the sodium polysulphides made in the fusion. Also used adjectively. Green ultramarine, a green pigment obtained as a first product in the manufacture of ultramarine, into which it is changed by subsequent treatment. Ultramarine ash or ashes (Paint.), a pigment which is the residuum of lapis lazuli after the ultramarine has been extracted. It was used by the old masters as a middle or neutral tint for flesh, skies, and draperies, being of a purer and tenderer gray that produced by the mixture of more positive colors. --Fairholt.
Ultramarine ash
Ultramarine Ul`tra*ma*rine", n. [Cf. Sp. ultramarino. So called because the lapis lazuli was originally brought from beyond the sea, -- from Asia.] (Chem.) A blue pigment formerly obtained by powdering lapis lazuli, but now produced in large quantities by fusing together silica, alumina, soda, and sulphur, thus forming a glass, colored blue by the sodium polysulphides made in the fusion. Also used adjectively. Green ultramarine, a green pigment obtained as a first product in the manufacture of ultramarine, into which it is changed by subsequent treatment. Ultramarine ash or ashes (Paint.), a pigment which is the residuum of lapis lazuli after the ultramarine has been extracted. It was used by the old masters as a middle or neutral tint for flesh, skies, and draperies, being of a purer and tenderer gray that produced by the mixture of more positive colors. --Fairholt.
Velvet tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Wild tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.

Meaning of Amarin from wikipedia

- ‹ The template Infobox company is being considered for merging. › Amarin Corporation is a biopharmaceutical company founded in 1993 and headquartered in...
- Saint-Amarin (German: Sankt Amarin; Alsatian: Sàntàmàrì) is a commune in the Haut-Rhin department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. Saint-Amarin territory...
- is the most po****r song that made this band very well known. After Jo Amarin (lead singer) died, Pause disbanded. After that, the other members (Nor...
- considered for merging. › Amarin Plaza is a shopping mall located in the centre of Bangkok's Ratchaprasong shopping district. Amarin Plaza has five floors...
- question of what the FDA would allow Amarin to say about E-EPA, and in March 2016 the FDA and Amarin agreed that Amarin would submit specific marketing material...
- Administration (FDA) granted the approval of it (as Vascepa) in 2012, to Amarin Corporation, and it became the second fish oil-based medication after omega-3...
- Suriyat Amarin Nattarika Thammapridanant as Phen, concubine of King Suriyat Amarin Khwanruedi Glomglorm as Amphan, concubine of King Suriyat Amarin Amonlada...
- King Saryu. Leigh Barwell as Nurse. David Allen Jones as Guitar Player. Amarin Cholvibul as Alu. Felix John Fraser as Secret Agent 2. John Dang as Singer...
- template Infobox Christian leader is being considered for merging. › Charles-Amarin Brand (27 June 1920 – 31 March 2013) was a French prelate of the Roman Catholic...
- himself in the Suriyat Amarin Palace—therefore came his name Somdet Phra Thi Nang Suriyat Amarin (Literally: the King of Suriyat Amarin Palace). Uthumphon...
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