Definition of verte. Meaning of verte. Synonyms of verte

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Definition of verte

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Adverted
Advert Ad*vert", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Adverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Adverting.] [L. advertere, v. t., to turn to; ad + vertere to turn: cf. F. avertir. See Advertise.] To turn the mind or attention; to refer; to take heed or notice; -- with to; as, he adverted to what was said. I may again advert to the distinction. --Owen. Syn: Syn.- To refer; allude; regard. See Refer.
Advertence
Advertence Ad*vert"ence, Advertency Ad*vert"en*cy, [OF. advertence, avertence, LL. advertentia, fr. L. advertens. See Advertent.] The act of adverting, of the quality of being advertent; attention; notice; regard; heedfulness. To this difference it is right that advertence should be had in regulating taxation. --J. S. Mill.
Advertency
Advertence Ad*vert"ence, Advertency Ad*vert"en*cy, [OF. advertence, avertence, LL. advertentia, fr. L. advertens. See Advertent.] The act of adverting, of the quality of being advertent; attention; notice; regard; heedfulness. To this difference it is right that advertence should be had in regulating taxation. --J. S. Mill.
Advertent
Advertent Ad*vert"ent, a. [L. advertens, -entis, p. pr. of advertere. See Advert.] Attentive; heedful; regardful. --Sir M. Hale. -- Ad*vert"ent*ly, adv.
Advertently
Advertent Ad*vert"ent, a. [L. advertens, -entis, p. pr. of advertere. See Advert.] Attentive; heedful; regardful. --Sir M. Hale. -- Ad*vert"ent*ly, adv.
Age of invertebrates
Invertebrate In*ver"te*brate, a. (Zo["o]l.) Destitute of a backbone; having no vertebr[ae]; of or pertaining to the Invertebrata. -- n. One of the Invertebrata. Age of invertebrates. See Age, and Silurian.
Animadverted
Animadvert An`i*mad*vert", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Animadverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Animadverting.] [L. animadvertere; animus mind + advertere to turn to; ad to + vertere to turn.] 1. To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that. --Dr. H. More. 2. To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon. I should not animadvert on him . . . if he had not used extreme severity in his judgment of the incomparable Shakespeare. --Dryden. 3. To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment. [Archaic] --Grew. Syn: To remark; comment; criticise; censure.
Animadverter
Animadverter An`i*mad*vert"er, n. One who animadverts; a censurer; also [Obs.], a chastiser.
Anticlinal vertebra
Anticlinal An`ti*cli"nal (-kl[imac]"nal), a. [Pref. anti- + Gr. kli`nein to incline.] Inclining or dipping in opposite directions. See Synclinal. Anticlinal line, Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line from which strata dip in opposite directions, as from the ridge of a roof. Anticlinal vertebra (Anat.), one of the dorsal vertebr[ae], which in many animals has an upright spine toward which the spines of the neighboring vertebr[ae] are inclined.
Averted
Avert A*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Averted; p. pr. & vb. n. Averting.] [L. avertere; a, ab + vertere to turn: cf. OF. avertir. See Verse, n.] To turn aside, or away; as, to avert the eyes from an object; to ward off, or prevent, the occurrence or effects of; as, how can the danger be averted? ``To avert his ire.' --Milton. When atheists and profane persons do hear of so many discordant and contrary opinions in religion, it doth avert them from the church. --Bacon. Till ardent prayer averts the public woe. --Prior.
Averted
Averted A*vert"ed, a. Turned away, esp. as an expression of feeling; also, offended; unpropitious. Who scornful pass it with averted eye. --Keble.
Averter
Averter A*vert"er, n. One who, or that which, averts.
Beaverteen
Beaverteen Bea"ver*teen, n. A kind of fustian made of coarse twilled cotton, shorn after dyeing. --Simmonds.
Controverted
Controvert Con"tro*vert, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Controverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Controverting.] [See Controversy.] To make matter of controversy; to dispute or oppose by reasoning; to contend against in words or writings; to contest; to debate. Some controverted points had decided according to the sense of the best jurists. --Macaulay.
Controverter
Controverter Con"tro*ver`ter, n. One who controverts; a controversial writer; a controversialist. Some controverters in divinity are like swaggerers in a tavern. --B. Jonson.
Converted
Convert Con*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Converted; p. pr. & vb. n. Converting.] [L. convertere, -versum; con- + vertere to turn: cf. F. convertir. See Verse.] 1. To cause to turn; to turn. [Obs.] O, which way shall I first convert myself? --B. Jonson. 2. To change or turn from one state or condition to another; to alter in form, substance, or quality; to transform; to transmute; as, to convert water into ice. If the whole atmosphere were converted into water. --T. Burnet. That still lessens The sorrow, and converts it nigh to joy. --Milton. 3. To change or turn from one belief or course to another, as from one religion to another or from one party or sect to another. No attempt was made to convert the Moslems. --Prescott. 4. To produce the spiritual change called conversion in (any one); to turn from a bad life to a good one; to change the heart and moral character of (any one) from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness. He which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death. --Lames v. 20. 5. To apply to any use by a diversion from the proper or intended use; to appropriate dishonestly or illegally. When a bystander took a coin to get it changed, and converted it, [it was] held no larceny. --Cooley. 6. To exchange for some specified equivalent; as, to convert goods into money. 7. (Logic) To change (one proposition) into another, so that what was the subject of the first becomes the predicate of the second. 8. To turn into another language; to translate. [Obs.] Which story . . . Catullus more elegantly converted. --B. Jonson. Converted guns, cast-iron guns lined with wrought-iron or steel tubes. --Farrow. Converting furnace (Steel Manuf.), a furnace in which wrought iron is converted into steel by cementation. Syn: To change; turn; transmute; appropriate.
Converted guns
Convert Con*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Converted; p. pr. & vb. n. Converting.] [L. convertere, -versum; con- + vertere to turn: cf. F. convertir. See Verse.] 1. To cause to turn; to turn. [Obs.] O, which way shall I first convert myself? --B. Jonson. 2. To change or turn from one state or condition to another; to alter in form, substance, or quality; to transform; to transmute; as, to convert water into ice. If the whole atmosphere were converted into water. --T. Burnet. That still lessens The sorrow, and converts it nigh to joy. --Milton. 3. To change or turn from one belief or course to another, as from one religion to another or from one party or sect to another. No attempt was made to convert the Moslems. --Prescott. 4. To produce the spiritual change called conversion in (any one); to turn from a bad life to a good one; to change the heart and moral character of (any one) from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness. He which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death. --Lames v. 20. 5. To apply to any use by a diversion from the proper or intended use; to appropriate dishonestly or illegally. When a bystander took a coin to get it changed, and converted it, [it was] held no larceny. --Cooley. 6. To exchange for some specified equivalent; as, to convert goods into money. 7. (Logic) To change (one proposition) into another, so that what was the subject of the first becomes the predicate of the second. 8. To turn into another language; to translate. [Obs.] Which story . . . Catullus more elegantly converted. --B. Jonson. Converted guns, cast-iron guns lined with wrought-iron or steel tubes. --Farrow. Converting furnace (Steel Manuf.), a furnace in which wrought iron is converted into steel by cementation. Syn: To change; turn; transmute; appropriate.
Convertend
Convertend Con`ver*tend", n. [L. convertenus to be converted.] (Logic) Any proposition which is subject to the process of conversion; -- so called in its relation to itself as converted, after which process it is termed the converse. See Converse, n. (Logic).
Converter
Converter Con*vert"er, n. 1. One who converts; one who makes converts. 2. (Steel Manuf.) A retort, used in the Bessemer process, in which molten cast iron is decarburized and converted into steel by a blast of air forced through the liquid metal.
Diverted
Divert Di*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Diverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Diverting.] [F. divertir, fr. L. divertere, diversum, to go different ways, turn aside; di- = dis- + vertere to turn. See Verse, and cf. Divorce.] 1. To turn aside; to turn off from any course or intended application; to deflect; as, to divert a river from its channel; to divert commerce from its usual course. That crude apple that diverted Eve. --Milton. 2. To turn away from any occupation, business, or study; to cause to have lively and agreeable sensations; to amuse; to entertain; as, children are diverted with sports; men are diverted with works of wit and humor. We are amused by a tale, diverted by a comedy. --C. J. Smith. Syn: To please; gratify; amuse; entertain; exhilarate; delight; recreate. See Amuse.
Diverter
Diverter Di*vert"er, n. One who, or that which, diverts, turns off, or pleases.
Everted
Evert E*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Everted; p. pr. & vb. n. Everting.] [L. evertere. See Everse.] 1. To overthrow; to subvert. [R.] --Ayliffe. 2. To turn outwards, or inside out, as an intestine.
Inadvertence
Inadvertence In`ad*vert"ence; pl. -ces, Inadvertency In`ad*vert"en*cy; pl. -cies, n. [Cf. F. inadvertance.] 1. The quality of being inadvertent; lack of heedfulness or attentiveness; inattention; negligence; as, many mistakes proceed from inadvertence. Inadvertency, or want of attendance to the sense and intention of our prayers. --Jer. Taylor. 2. An effect of inattention; a result of carelessness; an oversight, mistake, or fault from negligence. The productions of a great genius, with many lapses an inadvertencies, are infinitely preferable to works of an inferior kind of author which are scrupulously exact. --Addison. Syn: Inattention; heedlessness; carelessness; negligence; thoughtlessness. See Inattention.
Inadvertency
Inadvertence In`ad*vert"ence; pl. -ces, Inadvertency In`ad*vert"en*cy; pl. -cies, n. [Cf. F. inadvertance.] 1. The quality of being inadvertent; lack of heedfulness or attentiveness; inattention; negligence; as, many mistakes proceed from inadvertence. Inadvertency, or want of attendance to the sense and intention of our prayers. --Jer. Taylor. 2. An effect of inattention; a result of carelessness; an oversight, mistake, or fault from negligence. The productions of a great genius, with many lapses an inadvertencies, are infinitely preferable to works of an inferior kind of author which are scrupulously exact. --Addison. Syn: Inattention; heedlessness; carelessness; negligence; thoughtlessness. See Inattention.
Inadvertent
Inadvertent In`ad*vert"ent, a. [Cf. F. inadvertant. See 2d In-, and Advert.] Not turning the mind to a matter; heedless; careless; negligent; inattentive. An inadvertent step may crush the snail That crawls at evening in the public path. --Cowper. -- In`ad*vert"ent*ly, adv.
Inadvertently
Inadvertent In`ad*vert"ent, a. [Cf. F. inadvertant. See 2d In-, and Advert.] Not turning the mind to a matter; heedless; careless; negligent; inattentive. An inadvertent step may crush the snail That crawls at evening in the public path. --Cowper. -- In`ad*vert"ent*ly, adv.
Inconverted
Inconverted In`con*vert"ed, a. Not turned or changed about. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.
Intervertebral
Intervertebral In`ter*ver"te*bral, a. (Anat.) Between vertebr[ae]. -- In`ter*ver"te*bral*ly, adv.
Intervertebrally
Intervertebral In`ter*ver"te*bral, a. (Anat.) Between vertebr[ae]. -- In`ter*ver"te*bral*ly, adv.
Introverted
Introvert In`tro*vert", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Introverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Introverting.] [Pref. intro- + L. vertere, versum, to turn.] 1. To turn or bend inward. ``Introverted toes.' --Cowper. 2. To look within; to introspect. --Lew Wallace.

Meaning of verte from wikipedia

- the heraldic tincture , other uses , vert (disambiguation file:heraldic shield vert. svg , vert tincture in cl****ical heraldry , vert is the
- vertes, vértes or vertès may refer to: eva vertes (born 1985), american cancer researcher. marcel vertès (1895–1961), hungarian costume
- l'isle-verte is a small muni****lity located along the south s**** of the saint lawrence river , in the rivière-du-loup regional county
- the aiguille verte (eɡij vɛʁt; 4122 , m , abbr on), which is french for 'green needle', is a mountain in the mont blanc m****if in the
- the route verte (in english, the 'green route,' or the 'greenway') is a network of bicycling and multiuse trail s and designated roads ,
- les négresses vertes, which formed in 1987, is a french music group that is best described as a fusion of world music and some aspects of
- there are several places called Île verte (french for 'green island'): Île verte (grenoble), france. Île verte (bas-saint-laurent), quebec,
- the méridienne verte (green meridian) is a project devised by the architect paul chemetov for the 2000 celebration in france .
- baie verte-springdale is a provincial electoral district for the house of ****embly of newfoundland and labrador , canada .
- baie verte ('green bay' in french) may refer to: communities : baie verte, new brunswick baie verte, newfoundland and labrador places