Definition of pragma. Meaning of pragma. Synonyms of pragma

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word pragma. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word pragma and, of course, pragma synonyms and on the right images related to the word pragma.

Definition of pragma

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Polypragmatic
Polypragmatic Pol`y*prag*mat"ic, Polypragmatical Pol`y*prag*mat"ic*al, a. [Poly- + pragmatic, -ical.] Overbusy; officious. [R.] --Heywood.
Polypragmatical
Polypragmatic Pol`y*prag*mat"ic, Polypragmatical Pol`y*prag*mat"ic*al, a. [Poly- + pragmatic, -ical.] Overbusy; officious. [R.] --Heywood.
Polypragmaty
Polypragmaty Pol`y*prag"ma*ty, n. [Poly- + Gr. ? business.] The state of being overbusy. [R.]
Pragmatic
Pragmatic Prag*mat"ic, Pragmatical Prag*mat"ic*al, a. [L. pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. ?, fr. ? a thing done, business, fr. ? to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See Practical.] 1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or manner. The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical. --Evelyn. We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some delightful intermissions. --Milton. Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel. --Hare. 2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way; officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. ``Pragmatical officers of justice.' --Sir W. Scott. The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him the government of my whole family. --Arbuthnot. 3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects, rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of literature. ``Pragmatic history.' --Sir W. Hamilton. ``Pragmatic poetry.' --M. Arnold. Pragmatic sanction, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters; -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European history, two decrees under this name are particularly celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.
Pragmatic
Pragmatic Prag*mat"ic, n. 1. One skilled in affairs. My attorney and solicitor too; a fine pragmatic. --B. Jonson. 2. A solemn public ordinance or decree. A royal pragmatic was accordingly passed. --Prescott.
Pragmatic sanction
Pragmatic Prag*mat"ic, Pragmatical Prag*mat"ic*al, a. [L. pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. ?, fr. ? a thing done, business, fr. ? to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See Practical.] 1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or manner. The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical. --Evelyn. We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some delightful intermissions. --Milton. Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel. --Hare. 2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way; officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. ``Pragmatical officers of justice.' --Sir W. Scott. The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him the government of my whole family. --Arbuthnot. 3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects, rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of literature. ``Pragmatic history.' --Sir W. Hamilton. ``Pragmatic poetry.' --M. Arnold. Pragmatic sanction, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters; -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European history, two decrees under this name are particularly celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.
Pragmatical
Pragmatic Prag*mat"ic, Pragmatical Prag*mat"ic*al, a. [L. pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. ?, fr. ? a thing done, business, fr. ? to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See Practical.] 1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or manner. The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical. --Evelyn. We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some delightful intermissions. --Milton. Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel. --Hare. 2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way; officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. ``Pragmatical officers of justice.' --Sir W. Scott. The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him the government of my whole family. --Arbuthnot. 3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects, rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of literature. ``Pragmatic history.' --Sir W. Hamilton. ``Pragmatic poetry.' --M. Arnold. Pragmatic sanction, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters; -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European history, two decrees under this name are particularly celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.
Pragmatically
Pragmatically Prag*mat"ic*al*ly, adv. In a pragmatical manner.
Pragmaticalness
Pragmaticalness Prag*mat"ic*al*ness, n. The quality or state of being pragmatical.
Pragmatism
Pragmatism Prag"ma*tism, n. The quality or state of being pragmatic; in literature, the pragmatic, or philosophical, method. The narration of this apparently trifling circumstance belongs to the pragmatism of the history. --A. Murphy.
Pragmatist
Pragmatist Prag"ma*tist, n. One who is pragmatic.
Pragmatize
Pragmatize Prag"ma*tize, v. t. To consider, represent, or embody (something unreal) as fact; to materialize. [R.] ``A pragmatized metaphor.' --Tylor.

Meaning of pragma from wikipedia

- directive (programming), also known as a pragma or pragmat in several programming languages pragma once pragma (love), a model of love short for pragmatics
- article is #pragma once. the substitution or omission of the # is because of technical restrictions. in the c and c++ programming languages, #pragma once is
- in computer programming, a directive pragma (from 'pragmatic') is a language construct that specifies how a compiler (or ****embler or interpreter) should
- pragma-dialectics, or pragma-dialectical theory, developed by frans h. van eemeren and rob grootendorst (see 1984; 1992; 2004) at the university of amsterdam
- pragma systems is a developer and marketer of computer network software. the company sells software products that help it networks communicate securely
- vin1, vin2, beta, vout); #pragma hmpp sgemm synchronize } #pragma hmpp sgemm delegatedstore, args[vout] #pragma hmpp sgemm release those directives
- (kindred to philia), to give familial support and solidarity to the other. pragma – is a love that is driven by worldly realities, which could be undemonstrative
- parallelism in a parallel or kernels region. #pragma acc cache #pragma acc update #pragma acc declare #pragma acc wait there are some runtime api functions