Definition of friction. Meaning of friction. Synonyms of friction

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Definition of friction

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Affriction
Affriction Af*fric"tion, n. [L. affricare to rub on. See Friction.] The act of rubbing against. [Obs.]
Angle of friction
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Antifriction
Antifriction An`ti*fric"tion, n. Something to lessen friction; antiattrition. -- a. Tending to lessen friction.
Anti-friction wheels
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction balls
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction brake
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction chocks
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction clutch
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction composition
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction coupling
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction drop hammer
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction fuze
Fuze Fuze, n. A tube, filled with combustible matter, for exploding a shell, etc. See Fuse, n. Chemical fuze, a fuze in which substances separated until required for action are then brought into contact, and uniting chemically, produce explosion. Concussion fuze, a fuze ignited by the striking of the projectile. Electric fuze, a fuze which is ignited by heat or a spark produced by an electric current. Friction fuze, a fuze which is ignited by the heat evolved by friction. Percussion fuze, a fuze in which the ignition is produced by a blow on some fulminating compound. Time fuze, a fuze adapted, either by its length or by the character of its composition, to burn a certain time before producing an explosion.
Friction gear
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction machine
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction meter
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction powder
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction primer
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction rollers
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction tube
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friction wheel
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
friction wheels
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Frictional
Frictional Fric"tion*al, a. Relating to friction; moved by friction; produced by friction; as, frictional electricity. Frictional gearing, wheels which transmit motion by surface friction instead of teeth. The faces are sometimes made more or less V-shaped to increase or decrease friction, as required.
Frictional gearing
Frictional Fric"tion*al, a. Relating to friction; moved by friction; produced by friction; as, frictional electricity. Frictional gearing, wheels which transmit motion by surface friction instead of teeth. The faces are sometimes made more or less V-shaped to increase or decrease friction, as required.
Frictional gearing
Gearing Gear"ing, n. 1. Harness. 2. (Mach.) The parts by which motion imparted to one portion of an engine or machine is transmitted to another, considered collectively; as, the valve gearing of locomotive engine; belt gearing; esp., a train of wheels for transmitting and varying motion in machinery. Frictional gearing. See under Frictional. Gearing chain, an endless chain transmitted motion from one sprocket wheel to another. See Illust. of Chain wheel. Spur gearing, gearing in which the teeth or cogs are ranged round either the concave or the convex surface (properly the latter) of a cylindrical wheel; -- for transmitting motion between parallel shafts, etc.
Frictionless
Frictionless Fric"tion*less, a. Having no friction.
Hydrodynamic friction
Hydrodynamic Hy`dro*dy*nam"ic, Hydrodynamical Hy`dro*dy*nam"ic*al, a. [Hydro-, 1 + dynamic, -ical: cf. F. hydrodynamique.] Pertaining to, or derived from, the dynamical action of water of a liquid; of or pertaining to water power. Hydrodynamic friction, friction produced by the viscosity of a liquid in motion.
Rolling friction
Rolling Roll"ing, a. 1. Rotating on an axis, or moving along a surface by rotation; turning over and over as if on an axis or a pivot; as, a rolling wheel or ball. 2. Moving on wheels or rollers, or as if on wheels or rollers; as, a rolling chair. 3. Having gradual, rounded undulations of surface; as, a rolling country; rolling land. [U.S.] Rolling bridge. See the Note under Drawbridge. Rolling circle of a paddle wheel, the circle described by the point whose velocity equals the velocity of the ship. --J. Bourne. Rolling fire (Mil.), a discharge of firearms by soldiers in line, in quick succession, and in the order in which they stand. Rolling friction, that resistance to motion experienced by one body rolling upon another which arises from the roughness or other quality of the surfaces in contact. Rolling mill, a mill furnished with heavy rolls, between which heated metal is passed, to form it into sheets, rails, etc. Rolling press. (a) A machine for calendering cloth by pressure between revolving rollers. (b) A printing press with a roller, used in copperplate printing. Rolling stock, or Rolling plant, the locomotives and vehicles of a railway. Rolling tackle (Naut.), tackle used to steady the yards when the ship rolls heavily. --R. H. Dana, Jr.
Skin friction
Skin Skin, n. [Icel. skinn; akin to Sw. skinn, Dan. skind, AS. scinn, G. schined to skin.] 1. (Anat.) The external membranous integument of an animal. Note: In man, and the vertebrates generally, the skin consist of two layers, an outer nonsensitive and nonvascular epidermis, cuticle, or skarfskin, composed of cells which are constantly growing and multiplying in the deeper, and being thrown off in the superficial, layers; and an inner sensitive, and vascular dermis, cutis, corium, or true skin, composed mostly of connective tissue. 2. The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a calf, sheep, or goat. 3. A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids. See Bottle, 1. ``Skins of wine.' --Tennyson. 4. The bark or husk of a plant or fruit; the exterior coat of fruits and plants. 5. (Naut.) (a) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole. --Totten. (b) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing. Skin friction, Skin resistance (Naut.), the friction, or resistance, caused by the tendency of water to adhere to the immersed surface (skin) of a vessel. Skin graft (Surg.), a small portion of skin used in the process of grafting. See Graft, v. t., 2. Skin moth (Zo["o]l.), any insect which destroys the prepared skins of animals, especially the larva of Dermestes and Anthrenus. Skin of the teeth, nothing, or next to nothing; the least possible hold or advantage. --Job xix. 20. Skin wool, wool taken from dead sheep.
Sliding friction
Sliding Slid"ing, a. 1. That slides or slips; gliding; moving smoothly. 2. Slippery; elusory. [Obs.] That sliding science hath me made so bare. --Chaucer. Sliding friction (Mech.), the resistance one body meets with in sliding along the surface of another, as distinguished from rolling friction. Sliding gunter (Naut.), a topmast arranged with metallic fittings so as to be hoisted and lowered by means of halyards. Sliding keel (Naut), a movable keel, similar to a centeboard. Sliding pair. (Mech.) See the Note under Pair, n., 7. Sliding rule. Same as Slide rule, under Slide, n. Sliding scale. (a) A scale for raising or lowering imposts in proportion to the fall or rise of prices. (b) A variable scale of wages or of prices. (c) A slide rule. Sliding ways (Naut.), the timber guides used in launching a vessel.

Meaning of friction from wikipedia

- friction is the force resisting the relative motion of solid surfaces, fluid layers, and material elements sliding against each other.
- in fluid dynamics , drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid
- friction (real name ed keeley) is a drum and b**** dj from brighton , england. biography: brighton-raised friction is one of only a handful of
- a bearing is a machine element that constrains relative motion and reduces friction between moving parts to only the desired motion.
- friction welding (frw) is a solid-state welding process that generates heat through mechanical friction between a moving workpiece and a
- friction clutches : file:car clutch. png , a friction clutch the vast majority of clutches ultimately rely on frictional forces for their
- date october 2007 fricatives are consonant s produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close
- it includes the study and application of the principles of friction , lubrication and wear . tribology is a branch of mechanical