Definition of concus. Meaning of concus. Synonyms of concus

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Definition of concus

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Concubinacy
Concubinacy Con*cu"bi*na*cy, n. The practice of concubinage. [Obs.] --Strype.
Concubinage
Concubinage Con*cu"bi*nage, n. 1. The cohabiting of a man and a woman who are not legally married; the state of being a concubine. Note: In some countries, concubinage is marriage of an inferior kind, or performed with less solemnity than a true or formal marriage; or marriage with a woman of inferior condition, to whom the husband does not convey his rank or quality. Under Roman law, it was the living of a man and woman in sexual relations without marriage, but in conformity with local law. 2. (Law) A plea, in which it is alleged that the woman suing for dower was not lawfully married to the man in whose lands she seeks to be endowed, but that she was his concubine.
Concubinal
Concubinal Con*cu"bi*nal, a. [L. concubinalis.] Of or pertaining to concubinage.
Concubinarian
Concubinarian Con*cu`bi*na"ri*an, a. & n. Concubinary. The married and concubinarian, as well as looser clergy. --Milman.
Concubinaries
Concubinary Con*cu"bi*na*ry, n.; pl. Concubinaries. One who lives in concubinage. --Jer. Taylor.
Concubinary
Concubinary Con*cu"bi*na*ry, a. [LL. concubinarius.] Relating to concubinage; living in concubinage.
Concubinary
Concubinary Con*cu"bi*na*ry, n.; pl. Concubinaries. One who lives in concubinage. --Jer. Taylor.
Concubinate
Concubinate Con*cu"bi*nate, n. [L. concubinatus.] Concubinage. [Obs.] --Johnson.
Concubine
Concubine Con"cu*bine, n. [F., fr. L. concubina; con- + cubare to lie down, concumbere to lie together, akin to E. cubit.] 1. A woman who cohabits with a man without being his wife; a paramour. Note: Concubine has been sometimes, but rarely, used of a male paramour as well as of a female. --Trench. 2. A wife of inferior condition; a lawful wife, but not united to the man by the usual ceremonies, and of inferior condition. Such were Hagar and Keturah, the concubines of Abraham; and such concubines were allowed by the Roman laws. Their children were not heirs of their father.
Conculcate
Conculcate Con*cul"cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concultated; p. pr. & vb. n. Conculcating.] [L. conculcatus, p. p. of conculcare to conculcate fr. calx heel.] To tread or trample under foot. [Obs.] --Bp. Montagu -- Con`cul*ca"tion, n. [Obs.]
Conculcating
Conculcate Con*cul"cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concultated; p. pr. & vb. n. Conculcating.] [L. conculcatus, p. p. of conculcare to conculcate fr. calx heel.] To tread or trample under foot. [Obs.] --Bp. Montagu -- Con`cul*ca"tion, n. [Obs.]
Conculcation
Conculcate Con*cul"cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concultated; p. pr. & vb. n. Conculcating.] [L. conculcatus, p. p. of conculcare to conculcate fr. calx heel.] To tread or trample under foot. [Obs.] --Bp. Montagu -- Con`cul*ca"tion, n. [Obs.]
Concultated
Conculcate Con*cul"cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concultated; p. pr. & vb. n. Conculcating.] [L. conculcatus, p. p. of conculcare to conculcate fr. calx heel.] To tread or trample under foot. [Obs.] --Bp. Montagu -- Con`cul*ca"tion, n. [Obs.]
Concupiscence
Concupiscence Con*cu"pis*cence, n. [F., fr. L. concupiscentia.] Sexual lust; morbid carnal passion. Concupiscence like a pestilence walketh in darkness. --Horne.
Concupiscent
Concupiscent Con*cu"pis*cent, a. [L. concupiscens, p. pr. of concupiscere, v. incho. of concupere to long for; con- + cupere. See Covet.] Having sexual lust; libidinous; lustful; lecherous; salacious. --Johnson.
Concupiscential
Concupiscential Con*cu`pis*cen"tial, a. Relating to concupiscence. [Obs.] --Johnson.
Concupiscentious
Concupiscentious Con*cu`pis*cen"tious, a. Concupiscent. [Obs.]
Concupiscible
Concupiscible Con*cu`pis*ci*ble, a. [Cf. F. concupiscible.] 1. Exciting to, or liable to be affected by, concupiscence; provoking lustful desires. --Shak. 2. Exciting desire, good or evil. The schools reduce all the passions to these two heads, the concupiscible and irascible appetite. --South.
Concupiscibleness
Concupiscibleness Con*cu"pis*ci*ble*ness, n. The state of being concupiscible. [Obs.]
Concupy
Concupy Con"cu*py, n. Concupiscence. Note: [Used only in ``Troilus and Cressida'] --Shak.
Concur
Concur Con*cur", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concurred; p. pr. & vb. n. Concurring.] [L. concurrere to run together, agree; con- + currere to run. See Current.] 1. To run together; to meet. [Obs.] Anon they fierce encountering both concurred With grisly looks and faces like their fates. --J. Hughes. 2. To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help toward a common object or effect. When outward causes concur. --Jer. Colier. 3. To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to join; to act jointly; to agree; to coincide; to correspond. Mr. Burke concurred with Lord Chatham in opinion. --Fox. Tories and Whigs had concurred in paying honor to Walker. --Makaulay. This concurs directly with the letter. --Shak. 4. To assent; to consent. [Obs.] --Milton. Syn: To agree; unite; combine; conspire; coincide; approve; acquiesce; assent.
Concurred
Concur Con*cur", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concurred; p. pr. & vb. n. Concurring.] [L. concurrere to run together, agree; con- + currere to run. See Current.] 1. To run together; to meet. [Obs.] Anon they fierce encountering both concurred With grisly looks and faces like their fates. --J. Hughes. 2. To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help toward a common object or effect. When outward causes concur. --Jer. Colier. 3. To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to join; to act jointly; to agree; to coincide; to correspond. Mr. Burke concurred with Lord Chatham in opinion. --Fox. Tories and Whigs had concurred in paying honor to Walker. --Makaulay. This concurs directly with the letter. --Shak. 4. To assent; to consent. [Obs.] --Milton. Syn: To agree; unite; combine; conspire; coincide; approve; acquiesce; assent.
Concurrence
Concurrence Con*cur"rence, n. [F., competition, equality of rights, fr. LL. concurrentia competition.] 1. The act of concurring; a meeting or coming together; union; conjunction; combination. We have no other measure but our own ideas, with the concurence of other probable reasons, to persuade us. --Locke. 2. A meeting of minds; agreement in opinion; union in design or act; -- implying joint approbation. Tarquin the Proud was expelled by the universal concurrence of nobles and people. --Swift. 3. Agreement or consent, implying aid or contribution of power or influence; co["o]peration. We collect the greatness of the work, and the necessity of the divine concurrence to it. --Rogers. An instinct that works us to its own purposes without our concurrence. --Burke. 4. A common right; coincidence of equal powers; as, a concurrence of jurisdiction in two different courts.
Concurrency
Concurrency Con*cur"ren*cy, n. Concurrence.
Concurrent
Concurrent Con*cur"rent, n. 1. One who, or that which, concurs; a joint or contributory cause. To all affairs of importance there are three necessary concurrents . . . time, industry, and faculties. --Dr. H. More. 2. One pursuing the same course, or seeking the same objects; hence, a rival; an opponent. Menander . . . had no concurrent in his time that came near unto him. --Holland. 3. (Chron.) One of the supernumerary days of the year over fifty-two complete weeks; -- so called because they concur with the solar cycle, the course of which they follow.
Concurrently
Concurrently Con*cur"rent*ly, adv. With concurrence; unitedly.
Concurrentness
Concurrentness Con*cur"rent*ness, n. The state or quality of being concurrent; concurrence.
Concurring
Concur Con*cur", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concurred; p. pr. & vb. n. Concurring.] [L. concurrere to run together, agree; con- + currere to run. See Current.] 1. To run together; to meet. [Obs.] Anon they fierce encountering both concurred With grisly looks and faces like their fates. --J. Hughes. 2. To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help toward a common object or effect. When outward causes concur. --Jer. Colier. 3. To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to join; to act jointly; to agree; to coincide; to correspond. Mr. Burke concurred with Lord Chatham in opinion. --Fox. Tories and Whigs had concurred in paying honor to Walker. --Makaulay. This concurs directly with the letter. --Shak. 4. To assent; to consent. [Obs.] --Milton. Syn: To agree; unite; combine; conspire; coincide; approve; acquiesce; assent.
Concurring
Concurring Con*cur"ring, a. Agreeing. Concurring figure (Geom.), one which, being laid on another, exactly meets every part of it, or one which corresponds with another in all its parts.
Concurring figure
Concurring Con*cur"ring, a. Agreeing. Concurring figure (Geom.), one which, being laid on another, exactly meets every part of it, or one which corresponds with another in all its parts.

Meaning of concu from wikipedia

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- cha6405/safran-s-impose-dans-les-jets-avec-silvercrest-le-moteur-concu-par-sa-filiale-cessna. le moteur conçu par sa filiale cessna ,
- author concu m , title rapid clearance of mrna for plac1 gene in maternal blood after delivery , journal fetal. diagn. ther. ,
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- ca/le-soleil/affaires/jeux-et-logiciels/201002/15/01-949957-un-nouveau-prince-of-persia-concu-chez-ubisoft-quebec. persia conçu chez ubisoft
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- des bijoux conçus par pierre sterlé certains datant du début des années soixante peuvent ainsi porter aujourd'**** le nom de chaumet.
- 2003 'les agrémens (orchestre baroque de namur) conçu initialement comme un complément indispensable au chœur de il travaille
- dossier l'art et la guerre dans tous les états, concu et dirigé par ioana georgescu. montreal, canada, spring 2004. values. the catalogue
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