Definition of conce. Meaning of conce. Synonyms of conce

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Definition of conce

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Conceal
Conceal Con*ceal", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concealed; p. pr. & vb. n. Concealing.] [OF. conceler, L. concelare; con- + celareto hide; akin to AS. helan, G. hehlen, E. hele (to cover), helmet. See Hell, Helmet.] To hide or withdraw from observation; to cover; to cover or keep from sight; to prevent the discovery of; to withhold knowledge of. It is the glory of God to conceal a thing. --Prov. xxv. 2. Declare ye among the nations, . . . publish and conceal not. --Jer. l. 2. He which finds him shall deserve our thanks, . . . He that conceals him, death. --Shak. Syn: To hide; secrete; screen; cover; disguise; dissemble; mask; veil; cloak; screen. Usage: To Conceal, Hide, Disguise, Dissemble, Secrete. To hide is the generic term, which embraces all the rest. To conceal is simply not make known what we wish to keep secret. In the Bible hide often has the specific meaning of conceal. See --1 Sam. iii. 17, 18. To disguise or dissemble is to conceal by assuming some false appearance. To secrete is to hide in some place of secrecy. A man may conceal facts, disguise his sentiments, dissemble his feelings, secrete stolen goods. Bur double griefs afflict concealing hearts. --Spenser. Both dissemble deeply their affections. --Shak. We have in these words a primary sense, which reveals a future state, and a secondary sense, which hides and secretes it. --Warburton.
Concealable
Concealable Con*ceal"a*ble, a. Capable of being concealed.
Concealed
Conceal Con*ceal", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concealed; p. pr. & vb. n. Concealing.] [OF. conceler, L. concelare; con- + celareto hide; akin to AS. helan, G. hehlen, E. hele (to cover), helmet. See Hell, Helmet.] To hide or withdraw from observation; to cover; to cover or keep from sight; to prevent the discovery of; to withhold knowledge of. It is the glory of God to conceal a thing. --Prov. xxv. 2. Declare ye among the nations, . . . publish and conceal not. --Jer. l. 2. He which finds him shall deserve our thanks, . . . He that conceals him, death. --Shak. Syn: To hide; secrete; screen; cover; disguise; dissemble; mask; veil; cloak; screen. Usage: To Conceal, Hide, Disguise, Dissemble, Secrete. To hide is the generic term, which embraces all the rest. To conceal is simply not make known what we wish to keep secret. In the Bible hide often has the specific meaning of conceal. See --1 Sam. iii. 17, 18. To disguise or dissemble is to conceal by assuming some false appearance. To secrete is to hide in some place of secrecy. A man may conceal facts, disguise his sentiments, dissemble his feelings, secrete stolen goods. Bur double griefs afflict concealing hearts. --Spenser. Both dissemble deeply their affections. --Shak. We have in these words a primary sense, which reveals a future state, and a secondary sense, which hides and secretes it. --Warburton.
Concealed
Concealed Con*cealed", a. Hidden; kept from sight; secreted. -- Con*ceal"ed*ly, adv. -- Con*ceal"ed*ness, n. Concealed weapons (Law), dangerous weapons so carried on the person as to be knowingly or willfully concealed from sight, -- a practice forbidden by statute.
Concealed weapons
Concealed Con*cealed", a. Hidden; kept from sight; secreted. -- Con*ceal"ed*ly, adv. -- Con*ceal"ed*ness, n. Concealed weapons (Law), dangerous weapons so carried on the person as to be knowingly or willfully concealed from sight, -- a practice forbidden by statute.
Concealedly
Concealed Con*cealed", a. Hidden; kept from sight; secreted. -- Con*ceal"ed*ly, adv. -- Con*ceal"ed*ness, n. Concealed weapons (Law), dangerous weapons so carried on the person as to be knowingly or willfully concealed from sight, -- a practice forbidden by statute.
Concealedness
Concealed Con*cealed", a. Hidden; kept from sight; secreted. -- Con*ceal"ed*ly, adv. -- Con*ceal"ed*ness, n. Concealed weapons (Law), dangerous weapons so carried on the person as to be knowingly or willfully concealed from sight, -- a practice forbidden by statute.
Concealer
Concealer Con*ceal"er, n. One who conceals.
Concealing
Conceal Con*ceal", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concealed; p. pr. & vb. n. Concealing.] [OF. conceler, L. concelare; con- + celareto hide; akin to AS. helan, G. hehlen, E. hele (to cover), helmet. See Hell, Helmet.] To hide or withdraw from observation; to cover; to cover or keep from sight; to prevent the discovery of; to withhold knowledge of. It is the glory of God to conceal a thing. --Prov. xxv. 2. Declare ye among the nations, . . . publish and conceal not. --Jer. l. 2. He which finds him shall deserve our thanks, . . . He that conceals him, death. --Shak. Syn: To hide; secrete; screen; cover; disguise; dissemble; mask; veil; cloak; screen. Usage: To Conceal, Hide, Disguise, Dissemble, Secrete. To hide is the generic term, which embraces all the rest. To conceal is simply not make known what we wish to keep secret. In the Bible hide often has the specific meaning of conceal. See --1 Sam. iii. 17, 18. To disguise or dissemble is to conceal by assuming some false appearance. To secrete is to hide in some place of secrecy. A man may conceal facts, disguise his sentiments, dissemble his feelings, secrete stolen goods. Bur double griefs afflict concealing hearts. --Spenser. Both dissemble deeply their affections. --Shak. We have in these words a primary sense, which reveals a future state, and a secondary sense, which hides and secretes it. --Warburton.
Concede
Concede Con*cede", v. i. To yield or make concession. I wished you to concede to America, at a time when she prayed concession at our feet. --Burke.
Conceit
Conceit Con*ceit", v. i. To form an idea; to think. [Obs.] Those whose . . . vulgar apprehensions conceit but low of matrimonial purposes. --Milton.
Conceit
Conceit Con*ceit", v. t. To conceive; to imagine. [Archaic] The strong, by conceiting themselves weak, are therebly rendered as inactive . . . as if they really were so. --South. One of two bad ways you must conceit me, Either a coward or a flatterer. --Shak.
Conceitedly
Conceitedly Con*ceit"ed*ly, adv. 1. In an egotistical manner. 2. Fancifully; whimsically.
Conceitedness
Conceitedness Con*ceit"ed*ness, n. The state of being conceited; conceit; vanity. --Addison.
Conceivable
Conceivable Con*ceiv"a*ble, a. [Cf. F. concevable.] Capable of being conceived, imagined, or understood. ``Any conceivable weight.' --Bp. Wilkins. It is not conceivable that it should be indeed that very person whose shape and voice it assumed. --Atterbury. -- Con*ceiv"a*ble*ness, n. -- Con*ceiv"a*bly, adv.
Conceivableness
Conceivable Con*ceiv"a*ble, a. [Cf. F. concevable.] Capable of being conceived, imagined, or understood. ``Any conceivable weight.' --Bp. Wilkins. It is not conceivable that it should be indeed that very person whose shape and voice it assumed. --Atterbury. -- Con*ceiv"a*ble*ness, n. -- Con*ceiv"a*bly, adv.
Conceivably
Conceivable Con*ceiv"a*ble, a. [Cf. F. concevable.] Capable of being conceived, imagined, or understood. ``Any conceivable weight.' --Bp. Wilkins. It is not conceivable that it should be indeed that very person whose shape and voice it assumed. --Atterbury. -- Con*ceiv"a*ble*ness, n. -- Con*ceiv"a*bly, adv.
Conceive
Conceive Con*ceive", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Conceived; p. pr. & vb. n. Conceiving.] [OF. conzoivre, concever, conceveir, F. concevoir, fr. L. oncipere to take, to conceive; con- + capere to seize or take. See Capable, and cf. Conception.] 1. To receive into the womb and begin to breed; to begin the formation of the embryo of. She hath also conceived a son in her old age. --Luke i. 36. 2. To form in the mind; to plan; to devise; to generate; to originate; as, to conceive a purpose, plan, hope. It was among the ruins of the Capitol that I first conceived the idea of a work which has amused and exercised near twenty years of my life. --Gibbon. Conceiving and uttering from the heart words of falsehood. --Is. lix. 13. 3. To apprehend by reason or imagination; to take into the mind; to know; to imagine; to comprehend; to understand. ``I conceive you.' --Hawthorne. O horror, horror, horror! Tongue nor heart Cannot conceive nor name thee! --Shak. You will hardly conceive him to have been bred in the same climate. --Swift. Syn: To apprehend; imagine; suppose; understand; comprehend; believe; think.
Conceive
Conceive Con*ceive", v. i. 1. To have an embryo or fetus formed in the womb; to breed; to become pregnant. A virgin shall conceive, and bear a son. --Isa. vii. 14. 2. To have a conception, idea, or opinion; think; -- with of. Conceive of things clearly and distinctly in their own natures. --I. Watts.
Conceived
Conceive Con*ceive", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Conceived; p. pr. & vb. n. Conceiving.] [OF. conzoivre, concever, conceveir, F. concevoir, fr. L. oncipere to take, to conceive; con- + capere to seize or take. See Capable, and cf. Conception.] 1. To receive into the womb and begin to breed; to begin the formation of the embryo of. She hath also conceived a son in her old age. --Luke i. 36. 2. To form in the mind; to plan; to devise; to generate; to originate; as, to conceive a purpose, plan, hope. It was among the ruins of the Capitol that I first conceived the idea of a work which has amused and exercised near twenty years of my life. --Gibbon. Conceiving and uttering from the heart words of falsehood. --Is. lix. 13. 3. To apprehend by reason or imagination; to take into the mind; to know; to imagine; to comprehend; to understand. ``I conceive you.' --Hawthorne. O horror, horror, horror! Tongue nor heart Cannot conceive nor name thee! --Shak. You will hardly conceive him to have been bred in the same climate. --Swift. Syn: To apprehend; imagine; suppose; understand; comprehend; believe; think.
Conceiver
Conceiver Con*ceiv"er, n. One who conceives.
Conceiving
Conceive Con*ceive", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Conceived; p. pr. & vb. n. Conceiving.] [OF. conzoivre, concever, conceveir, F. concevoir, fr. L. oncipere to take, to conceive; con- + capere to seize or take. See Capable, and cf. Conception.] 1. To receive into the womb and begin to breed; to begin the formation of the embryo of. She hath also conceived a son in her old age. --Luke i. 36. 2. To form in the mind; to plan; to devise; to generate; to originate; as, to conceive a purpose, plan, hope. It was among the ruins of the Capitol that I first conceived the idea of a work which has amused and exercised near twenty years of my life. --Gibbon. Conceiving and uttering from the heart words of falsehood. --Is. lix. 13. 3. To apprehend by reason or imagination; to take into the mind; to know; to imagine; to comprehend; to understand. ``I conceive you.' --Hawthorne. O horror, horror, horror! Tongue nor heart Cannot conceive nor name thee! --Shak. You will hardly conceive him to have been bred in the same climate. --Swift. Syn: To apprehend; imagine; suppose; understand; comprehend; believe; think.
Concelebrate
Concelebrate Con*cel"e*brate, v. t. [L. concelebratus, p. p. of concelebrare to concelebrate.] To celebrate together. [Obs.] --Holland.
Concent
Concent Con*cent", n. [L. concentus, fr. concinere to sing together; con- + canere to sing.] 1. Concert of voices; concord of sounds; harmony; as, a concent of notes. [Archaic.] --Bacon. That undisturbed song of pure concent. --Milton. 2. Consistency; accordance. [Obs.] In concent to his own principles. --Atterbury.
Concenter
Concenter Con*cen"ter, Concentre Con*cen"tre, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concentered or Concentred; p. pr & vb. n. Concenteringor Concentring.] [F. concentrer, fr. L. con- + centrum center. See Center, and cf. Concentrate] To come to one point; to meet in, or converge toward, a common center; to have a common center. God, in whom all perfections concenter. --Bp. Beveridge.
Concenter
Concenter Con*cen"ter, Concentre Con*cen"tre, v. t. To draw or direct to a common center; to bring together at a focus or point, as two or more lines; to concentrate. In thee concentering all their precious beams. --Milton. All is concentered in a life intense. --Byren.
Concentered
Concenter Con*cen"ter, Concentre Con*cen"tre, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concentered or Concentred; p. pr & vb. n. Concenteringor Concentring.] [F. concentrer, fr. L. con- + centrum center. See Center, and cf. Concentrate] To come to one point; to meet in, or converge toward, a common center; to have a common center. God, in whom all perfections concenter. --Bp. Beveridge.
Concentering
Concenter Con*cen"ter, Concentre Con*cen"tre, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Concentered or Concentred; p. pr & vb. n. Concenteringor Concentring.] [F. concentrer, fr. L. con- + centrum center. See Center, and cf. Concentrate] To come to one point; to meet in, or converge toward, a common center; to have a common center. God, in whom all perfections concenter. --Bp. Beveridge.
Concentrate
Concentrate Con*cen"trate (? or ?), v. i. To approach or meet in a common center; to consolidate; as, population tends to concentrate in cities.
Concentrate
Concentrate Con*cen"trate (? or ?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Concentrated; p. pr. & vb. n. Concentrating.] [Pref. con- + L. centrum center. Cf. Concenter.] 1. To bring to, or direct toward, a common center; to unite more closely; to gather into one body, mass, or force; to fix; as, to concentrate rays of light into a focus; to concentrate the attention. (He) concentrated whole force at his own camp. --Motley. 2. To increase the strength and diminish the bulk of, as of a liquid or an ore; to intensify, by getting rid of useless material; to condense; as, to concentrate acid by evaporation; to concentrate by washing; -- opposed to dilute. Spirit of vinegar concentrated and reduced to its greatest strength. --Arbuthnot. Syn: To combine; to condense; to consolidate.

Meaning of conce from wikipedia