Definition of compo. Meaning of compo. Synonyms of compo

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Definition of compo

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Aromatic compound
Aromatic compound (Chem.), one of a large class of organic substances, as the oils of bitter almonds, wintergreen, and turpentine, the balsams, camphors, etc., many of which have an aromatic odor. They include many of the most important of the carbon compounds and may all be derived from the benzene group, C6H6. The term is extended also to many of their derivatives. Aromatic vinegar. See under Vinegar.
Binary compound
Binary Bi"na*ry, a. [L. binarius, fr. bini two by two, two at a time, fr. root of bis twice; akin to E. two: cf. F. binaire.] Compounded or consisting of two things or parts; characterized by two (things). Binary arithmetic, that in which numbers are expressed according to the binary scale, or in which two figures only, 0 and 1, are used, in lieu of ten; the cipher multiplying everything by two, as in common arithmetic by ten. Thus, 1 is one; 10 is two; 11 is three; 100 is four, etc. --Davies & Peck. Binary compound (Chem.), a compound of two elements, or of an element and a compound performing the function of an element, or of two compounds performing the function of elements. Binary logarithms, a system of logarithms devised by Euler for facilitating musical calculations, in which 1 is the logarithm of 2, instead of 10, as in the common logarithms, and the modulus 1.442695 instead of .43429448. Binary measure (Mus.), measure divisible by two or four; common time. Binary nomenclature (Nat. Hist.), nomenclature in which the names designate both genus and species. Binary scale (Arith.), a uniform scale of notation whose ratio is two. Binary star (Astron.), a double star whose members have a revolution round their common center of gravity. Binary theory (Chem.), the theory that all chemical compounds consist of two constituents of opposite and unlike qualities.
Binary compound
Compound Com"pound, n. 1. That which is compounded or formed by the union or mixture of elements ingredients, or parts; a combination of simples; a compound word; the result of composition. --Shak. Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun. --Goldsmith. When the word ``bishopric' was first made, it was made as a compound. --Earle. 2. (Chem.) A union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight, so combined as to form a distinct substance; as, water is a compound of oxygen and hydrogen. Note: Every definite chemical compound always contains the same elements, united in the same proportions by weight, and with the same internal arrangement. Binary compound (Chem.). See under Binary. Carbon compounds (Chem.). See under Carbon.
Carbon compounds
Carbon Car"bon (k[aum]r"b[o^]n), n. [F. carbone, fr. L. carbo coal; cf. Skr. [,c]r[=a] to cook.] (Chem.) An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc. Another modification is graphite, or blacklead, and in this it is soft, and occurs in hexagonal prisms or tables. When united with oxygen it forms carbon dioxide, commonly called carbonic acid, or carbonic oxide, according to the proportions of the oxygen; when united with hydrogen, it forms various compounds called hydrocarbons. Compare Diamond, and Graphite. Carbon compounds, Compounds of carbon (Chem.), those compounds consisting largely of carbon, commonly produced by animals and plants, and hence called organic compounds, though their synthesis may be effected in many cases in the laboratory. The formation of the compounds of carbon is not dependent upon the life process. --I. Remsen Carbon dioxide, Carbon monoxide. (Chem.) See under Carbonic. Carbon light (Elec.), an extremely brilliant electric light produced by passing a galvanic current through two carbon points kept constantly with their apexes neary in contact. Carbon point (Elec.), a small cylinder or bit of gas carbon moved forward by clockwork so that, as it is burned away by the electric current, it shall constantly maintain its proper relation to the opposing point. Carbon tissue, paper coated with gelatine and pigment, used in the autotype process of photography. --Abney. Gas carbon, a compact variety of carbon obtained as an incrustation on the interior of gas retorts, and used for the manufacture of the carbon rods of pencils for the voltaic, arc, and for the plates of voltaic batteries, etc.
Carbon compounds
Compound Com"pound, n. 1. That which is compounded or formed by the union or mixture of elements ingredients, or parts; a combination of simples; a compound word; the result of composition. --Shak. Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun. --Goldsmith. When the word ``bishopric' was first made, it was made as a compound. --Earle. 2. (Chem.) A union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight, so combined as to form a distinct substance; as, water is a compound of oxygen and hydrogen. Note: Every definite chemical compound always contains the same elements, united in the same proportions by weight, and with the same internal arrangement. Binary compound (Chem.). See under Binary. Carbon compounds (Chem.). See under Carbon.
chemistry of the carbon compounds
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Compone
Compone Com*pone" (-p[=o]n"), v. t. [L. componere. See Compound.] To compose; to settle; to arrange. [Obs.] A good pretense for componing peace. --Strype.
Compone
Compone Com*po"ne (k[o^]m*p[=o]"n[asl]), a. [F.] See Compony.
Component
Component Com*po"nent (k[o^]m*p[=o]"nent), a. [L. componens, p. pr. of componere. See Compound, v. t.] Serving, or helping, to form; composing; constituting; constituent. The component parts of natural bodies. --Sir I. Newton.
Component
Component Com*po"nent, n. A constituent part; an ingredient. Component of force (Mech.), a force which, acting conjointly with one or more forces, produces the effect of a single force or resultant; one of a number of forces into which a single force may be resolved.
Component of force
Component Com*po"nent, n. A constituent part; an ingredient. Component of force (Mech.), a force which, acting conjointly with one or more forces, produces the effect of a single force or resultant; one of a number of forces into which a single force may be resolved.
Comport
Comport Com*port", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Comported; p. pr. & vb. n. Comporting.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com- + portare to carry. See Port demeanor.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury. [Obs.] --Barrow. 2. To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with. How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness. --Beau. & Fl. How their behavior herein comported with the institution. --Locke.
Comport
Comport Com*port", v. t. 1. To bear; to endure; to brook; to put with. [Obs.] The malcontented sort That never can the present state comport. --Daniel. 2. To carry; to conduct; -- with a reflexive pronoun. Observe how Lord Somers . . . comported himself. --Burke.
Comport
Comport Com"port (?, formerly ?), n. [Cf. OF. comport.] Manner of acting; behavior; conduct; deportment. [Obs.] I knew them well, and marked their rude comport. --Dryden.
Comportable
Comportable Com*port"a*ble, a. Suitable; consistent. [Obs.] ``Some comportable method.' --Wotton.
Comportance
Comportance Com*port"ance, n. Behavior; comport. [Obs.] Goodly comportance each to other bear. --Spenser.
Comportation
Comportation Com`por*ta"tion, n. [L. comportatio.] A bringing together. [Obs.] --Bp. Richardson.
Comported
Comport Com*port", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Comported; p. pr. & vb. n. Comporting.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com- + portare to carry. See Port demeanor.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury. [Obs.] --Barrow. 2. To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with. How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness. --Beau. & Fl. How their behavior herein comported with the institution. --Locke.
Comporting
Comport Com*port", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Comported; p. pr. & vb. n. Comporting.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com- + portare to carry. See Port demeanor.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury. [Obs.] --Barrow. 2. To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with. How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness. --Beau. & Fl. How their behavior herein comported with the institution. --Locke.
Comportment
Comportment Com*port"ment, n. [F. comportement.] Manner of acting; behavior; bearing. A graceful comportment of their bodies. --Cowley. Her serious and devout comportment. --Addison.
Compos mentis
Compos mentis Com"pos men"tis [L.] (Law) Sane in mind; being of sound mind, memory, and understanding.
Compose
Compose Com*pose", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Composed; p. pr. & vb. n. Composing.] [F. composer; com- + poser to place. The sense is that of L. componere, but the origin is different. See Pose, v. t.] 1. To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion. Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection. --Bp. Sprat. 2. To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute. Their borrowed gold composed The calf in Oreb. --Milton. A few useful things . . . compose their intellectual possessions. --I. Watts. 3. To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture. Let me compose Something in verse as well as prose. --Pope. The genius that composed such works as the ``Standard' and ``Last Supper'. --B. R. Haydon. 4. To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate. In a peaceful grave my corpse compose. --Dryden. How in safety best we may Compose our present evils. --Milton. 5. To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet. Compose thy mind; Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed. --Dryden. 6. (Print.) To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).
Compose
Compose Com*pose", v. i. To come to terms. [Obs.] --Shak.
Composed
Compose Com*pose", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Composed; p. pr. & vb. n. Composing.] [F. composer; com- + poser to place. The sense is that of L. componere, but the origin is different. See Pose, v. t.] 1. To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion. Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection. --Bp. Sprat. 2. To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute. Their borrowed gold composed The calf in Oreb. --Milton. A few useful things . . . compose their intellectual possessions. --I. Watts. 3. To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture. Let me compose Something in verse as well as prose. --Pope. The genius that composed such works as the ``Standard' and ``Last Supper'. --B. R. Haydon. 4. To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate. In a peaceful grave my corpse compose. --Dryden. How in safety best we may Compose our present evils. --Milton. 5. To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet. Compose thy mind; Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed. --Dryden. 6. (Print.) To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).
Composed
Composed Com*posed", a. Free from agitation; calm; sedate; quiet; tranquil; self-possessed. The Mantuan there in sober triumph sate, Composed his posture, and his look sedate. --Pope. -- Com*pos"ed*ly, adv. -- Com*pos"ed*ness, n.
Composedly
Composed Com*posed", a. Free from agitation; calm; sedate; quiet; tranquil; self-possessed. The Mantuan there in sober triumph sate, Composed his posture, and his look sedate. --Pope. -- Com*pos"ed*ly, adv. -- Com*pos"ed*ness, n.
Composedness
Composed Com*posed", a. Free from agitation; calm; sedate; quiet; tranquil; self-possessed. The Mantuan there in sober triumph sate, Composed his posture, and his look sedate. --Pope. -- Com*pos"ed*ly, adv. -- Com*pos"ed*ness, n.
Composing
Compose Com*pose", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Composed; p. pr. & vb. n. Composing.] [F. composer; com- + poser to place. The sense is that of L. componere, but the origin is different. See Pose, v. t.] 1. To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion. Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection. --Bp. Sprat. 2. To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute. Their borrowed gold composed The calf in Oreb. --Milton. A few useful things . . . compose their intellectual possessions. --I. Watts. 3. To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture. Let me compose Something in verse as well as prose. --Pope. The genius that composed such works as the ``Standard' and ``Last Supper'. --B. R. Haydon. 4. To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate. In a peaceful grave my corpse compose. --Dryden. How in safety best we may Compose our present evils. --Milton. 5. To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet. Compose thy mind; Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed. --Dryden. 6. (Print.) To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).
Composing
Composing Com*pos"ing, a. 1. Tending to compose or soothe. 2. Pertaining to, or used in, composition. Composing frame (Print.), a stand for holding cases of type when in use. Composing rule (Print.), a thin slip of brass or steel, against which the type is arranged in a composing stick, or by the aid of which stickfuls or handfuls or type are lifted; -- called also setting rule. Composing stick (Print.), an instrument usually of metal, which the compositor holds in his left hand, and in which he arranges the type in words and lines. It has one open side, and one adjustable end by means of which the length of the lines, and consequently the width of the page or column, may be determined.
Composing frame
Composing Com*pos"ing, a. 1. Tending to compose or soothe. 2. Pertaining to, or used in, composition. Composing frame (Print.), a stand for holding cases of type when in use. Composing rule (Print.), a thin slip of brass or steel, against which the type is arranged in a composing stick, or by the aid of which stickfuls or handfuls or type are lifted; -- called also setting rule. Composing stick (Print.), an instrument usually of metal, which the compositor holds in his left hand, and in which he arranges the type in words and lines. It has one open side, and one adjustable end by means of which the length of the lines, and consequently the width of the page or column, may be determined.

Meaning of compo from wikipedia

- compo may refer to: demoscene compo , a competition involving multimedia 'demo' programs. summer wine named compo simmonite, pla**** by bill owen
- the battys (compo's neighbours): nora batty (kathy staff ): (1973, 1975, 1976–2001, 2002, 2003–2008) compo's next door neighbour, nora was
- a compo is a contest relating to programming , computer graphics and music that takes place within the demoscene and related subcultures
- the compo–owenoke historic district is a 154 , acre historic district in westport, connecticut that was listed on the national register
- compo is a 1989 low budget australian film. references : external links : http://www. imdb. com/title/tt0094902/ compo at imdb category:australian
- indian armed forces have a host of meals ready to eat (mre) including the one man compo pack ration, mini compo pack, survival ration, a
- compo is a mouldable resin worked either by hand or more usually pressed into moulds to produce decorative work. it's now most commonly
- compo company ltd. was canada's first independent record company. the compo company was founded in 1918 in lachine, quebec , by herbert
- non compos mentis is a term meaning 'not of sound mind non compos mentis derives from the latin non meaning 'not', compos meaning 'having
- charles compo is a contemporary american composer, flutist, saxophonist and guitarist. file:charles compo, bi coastal music, 2009.
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