Definition of clover. Meaning of clover. Synonyms of clover

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word clover. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word clover and, of course, clover synonyms and on the right images related to the word clover.

Definition of clover

No result for clover. Showing similar results...

Buffalo clover
Buffalo Buf"fa*lo, n.; pl. Buffaloes. [Sp. bufalo (cf. It. bufalo, F. buffle), fr. L. bubalus, bufalus, a kind of African stag or gazelle; also, the buffalo or wild ox, fr. Gr. ? buffalo, prob. fr. ? ox. See Cow the animal, and cf. Buff the color, and Bubale.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A species of the genus Bos or Bubalus (B. bubalus), originally from India, but now found in most of the warmer countries of the eastern continent. It is larger and less docile than the common ox, and is fond of marshy places and rivers. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A very large and savage species of the same genus (B. Caffer) found in South Africa; -- called also Cape buffalo. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of wild ox. 4. (Zo["o]l.) The bison of North America. 5. A buffalo robe. See Buffalo robe, below. 6. (Zo["o]l.) The buffalo fish. See Buffalo fish, below. Buffalo berry (Bot.), a shrub of the Upper Missouri (Sherherdia argentea) with acid edible red berries. Buffalo bird (Zo["o]l.), an African bird of the genus Buphaga, of two species. These birds perch upon buffaloes and cattle, in search of parasites. Buffalo bug, the carpet beetle. See under Carpet. Buffalo chips, dry dung of the buffalo, or bison, used for fuel. [U.S.] Buffalo clover (Bot.), a kind of clover (Trifolium reflexum and T.soloniferum) found in the ancient grazing grounds of the American bison. Buffalo cod (Zo["o]l.), a large, edible, marine fish (Ophiodon elongatus) of the northern Pacific coast; -- called also blue cod, and cultus cod. Buffalo fish (Zo["o]l.), one of several large fresh-water fishes of the family Catostomid[ae], of the Mississippi valley. The red-mouthed or brown (Ictiobus bubalus), the big-mouthed or black (Bubalichthys urus), and the small-mouthed (B. altus), are among the more important species used as food. Buffalo fly, or Buffalo gnat (Zo["o]l.), a small dipterous insect of the genus Simulium, allied to the black fly of the North. It is often extremely abundant in the lower part of the Mississippi valley and does great injury to domestic animals, often killing large numbers of cattle and horses. In Europe the Columbatz fly is a species with similar habits. Buffalo grass (Bot.), a species of short, sweet grass (Buchlo["e] dactyloides), from two to four inches high, covering the prairies on which the buffaloes, or bisons, feed. [U.S.] Buffalo nut (Bot.), the oily and drupelike fruit of an American shrub (Pyrularia oleifera); also, the shrub itself; oilnut. Buffalo robe, the skin of the bison of North America, prepared with the hair on; -- much used as a lap robe in sleighs.
Clovered
Clovered Clo"vered, a. Covered with growing clover. Flocks thick nibbling through the clovered vale. --Thomson.
Dutch clover
touto. The English have applied the name especially to the Germanic people living nearest them, the Hollanders. Cf. Derrick, Teutonic.] Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants. Dutch auction. See under Auction. Dutch cheese, a small, pound, hard cheese, made from skim milk. Dutch clinker, a kind of brick made in Holland. It is yellowish, very hard, and long and narrow in shape. Dutch clover (Bot.), common white clover (Trifolium repens), the seed of which was largely imported into England from Holland. Dutch concert, a so-called concert in which all the singers sing at the same time different songs. [Slang] Dutch courage, the courage of partial intoxication. [Slang] --Marryat. Dutch door, a door divided into two parts, horizontally, so arranged that the lower part can be shut and fastened, while the upper part remains open. Dutch foil, Dutch leaf, or Dutch gold, a kind of brass rich in copper, rolled or beaten into thin sheets, used in Holland to ornament toys and paper; -- called also Dutch mineral, Dutch metal, brass foil, and bronze leaf. Dutch liquid (Chem.), a thin, colorless, volatile liquid, C2H4Cl2, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor, produced by the union of chlorine and ethylene or olefiant gas; -- called also Dutch oil. It is so called because discovered (in 1795) by an association of four Hollandish chemists. See Ethylene, and Olefiant.
Egyptian clover
Berseem Ber*seem", n. [Ar. bersh[=i]m clover.] An Egyptian clover (Trifolium alexandrinum) extensively cultivated as a forage plant and soil-renewing crop in the alkaline soils of the Nile valley, and now introduced into the southwestern United States. It is more succulent than other clovers or than alfalfa. Called also Egyptian clover.
Harts clover
Harts clover Hart"s` clo`ver (Bot.) Melilot or sweet clover. See Melilot.
Hop clover
Hop Hop, n. [OE. hoppe; akin to D. hop, hoppe, OHG. hopfo, G. hopfen; cf. LL. hupa, W. hopez, Armor. houpez, and Icel. humall, SW. & Dan. humle.] 1. (Bot.) A climbing plant (Humulus Lupulus), having a long, twining, annual stalk. It is cultivated for its fruit (hops). 2. The catkin or strobilaceous fruit of the hop, much used in brewing to give a bitter taste. 3. The fruit of the dog-rose. See Hip. Hop back. (Brewing) See under 1st Back. Hop clover (Bot.), a species of yellow clover having heads like hops in miniature (Trifolium agrarium, and T. procumbens). Hop flea (Zo["o]l.), a small flea beetle (Haltica concinna), very injurious to hops. Hop fly (Zo["o]l.), an aphid (Phorodon humuli), very injurious to hop vines. Hop froth fly (Zo["o]l.), an hemipterous insect (Aphrophora interrupta), allied to the cockoo spits. It often does great damage to hop vines. Hop hornbeam (Bot.), an American tree of the genus Ostrya (O. Virginica) the American ironwood; also, a European species (O. vulgaris). Hop moth (Zo["o]l.), a moth (Hypena humuli), which in the larval state is very injurious to hop vines. Hop picker, one who picks hops. Hop pole, a pole used to support hop vines. Hop tree (Bot.), a small American tree (Ptelia trifoliata), having broad, flattened fruit in large clusters, sometimes used as a substitute for hops. Hop vine (Bot.), the climbing vine or stalk of the hop.
Japan clover
Japan Ja*pan", a. Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware. Japan allspice (Bot.), a spiny shrub from Japan (Chimonanthus fragrans), related to the Carolina allspice. Japan black (Chem.), a quickly drying black lacquer or varnish, consisting essentially of asphaltum dissolved in naphtha or turpentine, and used for coating ironwork; -- called also Brunswick black, Japan lacquer, or simply Japan. Japan camphor, ordinary camphor brought from China or Japan, as distinguished from the rare variety called borneol or Borneo camphor. Japan clover, or Japan pea (Bot.), a cloverlike plant (Lespedeza striata) from Eastern Asia, useful for fodder, first noticed in the Southern United States about 1860, but now become very common. During the Civil War it was called variously Yankee clover and Rebel clover. Japan earth. See Catechu. Japan ink, a kind of writing ink, of a deep, glossy black when dry. Japan varnish, a varnish prepared from the milky juice of the Rhus vernix, a small Japanese tree related to the poison sumac.
Prairie clover
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
Rebel clover
Japan Ja*pan", a. Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware. Japan allspice (Bot.), a spiny shrub from Japan (Chimonanthus fragrans), related to the Carolina allspice. Japan black (Chem.), a quickly drying black lacquer or varnish, consisting essentially of asphaltum dissolved in naphtha or turpentine, and used for coating ironwork; -- called also Brunswick black, Japan lacquer, or simply Japan. Japan camphor, ordinary camphor brought from China or Japan, as distinguished from the rare variety called borneol or Borneo camphor. Japan clover, or Japan pea (Bot.), a cloverlike plant (Lespedeza striata) from Eastern Asia, useful for fodder, first noticed in the Southern United States about 1860, but now become very common. During the Civil War it was called variously Yankee clover and Rebel clover. Japan earth. See Catechu. Japan ink, a kind of writing ink, of a deep, glossy black when dry. Japan varnish, a varnish prepared from the milky juice of the Rhus vernix, a small Japanese tree related to the poison sumac.
Snail clover
Snail Snail (sn[=a]l), n. [OE. snaile, AS. sn[ae]gel, snegel, sn[ae]gl; akin to G. schnecke, OHG. snecko, Dan. snegl, Icel. snigill.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix and many allied genera of the family Helicid[ae]. They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on vegetation; a land snail. (b) Any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See Pond snail, under Pond, and Sea snail. 2. Hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing. 3. (Mech.) A spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a striking clock. 4. A tortoise; in ancient warfare, a movable roof or shed to protect besiegers; a testudo. [Obs.] They had also all manner of gynes [engines] . . . that needful is [in] taking or sieging of castle or of city, as snails, that was naught else but hollow pavises and targets, under the which men, when they fought, were heled [protected], . . . as the snail is in his house; therefore they cleped them snails. --Vegetius (Trans.). 5. (Bot.) The pod of the sanil clover. Ear snail, Edible snail, Pond snail, etc. See under Ear, Edible, etc. Snail borer (Zo["o]l.), a boring univalve mollusk; a drill. Snail clover (Bot.), a cloverlike plant (Medicago scuttellata, also, M. Helix); -- so named from its pods, which resemble the shells of snails; -- called also snail trefoil, snail medic, and beehive. Snail flower (Bot.), a leguminous plant (Phaseolus Caracalla) having the keel of the carolla spirally coiled like a snail shell. Snail shell (Zo["o]l.), the shell of snail. Snail trefoil. (Bot.) See Snail clover, above.
Sweet clover
Sweet Sweet, a. [Compar. Sweeter; superl. Sweetest.] [OE. swete, swote, sote, AS. sw[=e]te; akin to OFries. sw[=e]te, OS. sw[=o]ti, D. zoet, G. s["u]ss, OHG. suozi, Icel. s[ae]tr, s[oe]tr, Sw. s["o]t, Dan. s["o]d, Goth. suts, L. suavis, for suadvis, Gr. ?, Skr. sv[=a]du sweet, svad, sv[=a]d, to sweeten. [root]175. Cf. Assuage, Suave, Suasion.] 1. Having an agreeable taste or flavor such as that of sugar; saccharine; -- opposed to sour and bitter; as, a sweet beverage; sweet fruits; sweet oranges. 2. Pleasing to the smell; fragrant; redolent; balmy; as, a sweet rose; sweet odor; sweet incense. The breath of these flowers is sweet to me. --Longfellow. 3. Pleasing to the ear; soft; melodious; harmonious; as, the sweet notes of a flute or an organ; sweet music; a sweet voice; a sweet singer. To make his English sweet upon his tongue. --Chaucer. A voice sweet, tremulous, but powerful. --Hawthorne. 4. Pleasing to the eye; beautiful; mild and attractive; fair; as, a sweet face; a sweet color or complexion. Sweet interchange Of hill and valley, rivers, woods, and plains. --Milton. 5. Fresh; not salt or brackish; as, sweet water. --Bacon. 6. Not changed from a sound or wholesome state. Specifically: (a) Not sour; as, sweet milk or bread. (b) Not state; not putrescent or putrid; not rancid; as, sweet butter; sweet meat or fish. 7. Plaesing to the mind; mild; gentle; calm; amiable; winning; presuasive; as, sweet manners. Canst thou bind the sweet influence of Pleiades? --Job xxxviii. 31. Mildness and sweet reasonableness is the one established rule of Christian working. --M. Arnold. Note: Sweet is often used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, sweet-blossomed, sweet-featured, sweet-smelling, sweet-tempered, sweet-toned, etc. Sweet alyssum. (Bot.) See Alyssum. Sweet apple. (Bot.) (a) Any apple of sweet flavor. (b) See Sweet-top. Sweet bay. (Bot.) (a) The laurel (laurus nobilis). (b) Swamp sassafras. Sweet calabash (Bot.), a plant of the genus Passiflora (P. maliformis) growing in the West Indies, and producing a roundish, edible fruit, the size of an apple. Sweet cicely. (Bot.) (a) Either of the North American plants of the umbelliferous genus Osmorrhiza having aromatic roots and seeds, and white flowers. --Gray. (b) A plant of the genus Myrrhis (M. odorata) growing in England. Sweet calamus, or Sweet cane. (Bot.) Same as Sweet flag, below. Sweet Cistus (Bot.), an evergreen shrub (Cistus Ladanum) from which the gum ladanum is obtained. Sweet clover. (Bot.) See Melilot. Sweet coltsfoot (Bot.), a kind of butterbur (Petasites sagittata) found in Western North America. Sweet corn (Bot.), a variety of the maize of a sweet taste. See the Note under Corn. Sweet fern (Bot.), a small North American shrub (Comptonia, or Myrica, asplenifolia) having sweet-scented or aromatic leaves resembling fern leaves. Sweet flag (Bot.), an endogenous plant (Acorus Calamus) having long flaglike leaves and a rootstock of a pungent aromatic taste. It is found in wet places in Europe and America. See Calamus, 2. Sweet gale (Bot.), a shrub (Myrica Gale) having bitter fragrant leaves; -- also called sweet willow, and Dutch myrtle. See 5th Gale. Sweet grass (Bot.), holy, or Seneca, grass. Sweet gum (Bot.), an American tree (Liquidambar styraciflua). See Liquidambar. Sweet herbs, fragrant herbs cultivated for culinary purposes. Sweet John (Bot.), a variety of the sweet William. Sweet leaf (Bot.), horse sugar. See under Horse. Sweet marjoram. (Bot.) See Marjoram. Sweet marten (Zo["o]l.), the pine marten. Sweet maudlin (Bot.), a composite plant (Achillea Ageratum) allied to milfoil. Sweet oil, olive oil. Sweet pea. (Bot.) See under Pea. Sweet potato. (Bot.) See under Potato. Sweet rush (Bot.), sweet flag. Sweet spirits of niter (Med. Chem.) See Spirit of nitrous ether, under Spirit. Sweet sultan (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea moschata), also, the yellow-flowered (C. odorata); -- called also sultan flower. Sweet tooth, an especial fondness for sweet things or for sweetmeats. [Colloq.] Sweet William. (a) (Bot.) A species of pink (Dianthus barbatus) of many varieties. (b) (Zo["o]l.) The willow warbler. (c) (Zo["o]l.) The European goldfinch; -- called also sweet Billy. [Prov. Eng.] Sweet willow (Bot.), sweet gale. Sweet wine. See Dry wine, under Dry. To be sweet on, to have a particular fondness for, or special interest in, as a young man for a young woman. [Colloq.] --Thackeray. Syn: Sugary; saccharine; dulcet; luscious.
Yankee clover
Japan Ja*pan", a. Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware. Japan allspice (Bot.), a spiny shrub from Japan (Chimonanthus fragrans), related to the Carolina allspice. Japan black (Chem.), a quickly drying black lacquer or varnish, consisting essentially of asphaltum dissolved in naphtha or turpentine, and used for coating ironwork; -- called also Brunswick black, Japan lacquer, or simply Japan. Japan camphor, ordinary camphor brought from China or Japan, as distinguished from the rare variety called borneol or Borneo camphor. Japan clover, or Japan pea (Bot.), a cloverlike plant (Lespedeza striata) from Eastern Asia, useful for fodder, first noticed in the Southern United States about 1860, but now become very common. During the Civil War it was called variously Yankee clover and Rebel clover. Japan earth. See Catechu. Japan ink, a kind of writing ink, of a deep, glossy black when dry. Japan varnish, a varnish prepared from the milky juice of the Rhus vernix, a small Japanese tree related to the poison sumac.
Yankee clover
Yankee Yan"kee, a. Of or pertaining to a Yankee; characteristic of the Yankees. The alertness of the Yankee aspect. --Hawthorne. Yankee clover. (Bot.) See Japan clover, under Japan.

Meaning of clover from wikipedia

- for the mobile dating application, see clover (application). for other uses, see clover (disambiguation). clover (trifolium), or trefoil, is a genus of
- 'lucky clover' and 'lucky leaf' redirect here. the term is also often used for the wood-sorrel ,oxalis acetosella, oxalis tetraphylla, a common potted
- clover' redirects here. for the manga series, see honey and clover. melilotus albus (bokhara clover, honey clover, tree clover, sweet clover,
- clover hill is an unincorporated community in albemarle county, virginia. 'clover hill'. geographic names information system, u.s. geological survey
- little clover hill is an unincorporated community in albemarle county, virginia. 'little clover hill'. geographic names information system, u.s. geological
- hot springs (also, clover swale) is a former settlement in modoc county, california. it was located 20 miles (32 km) north of adin. the hot springs post
- clover cr**** is a cdp located in snohomish county, washington. in 2010, it had a po****tion of 6,522 inhabitants. 3,031 are male. 3,491 are female. clover
- for the album, see crimson and clover (album). 'crimson and clover' is a 1968 song by american rock band tommy james and the shondells. written by the