Definition of capit. Meaning of capit. Synonyms of capit

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Definition of capit

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Active capital
Active Ac"tive, a. [F. actif, L. activus, fr. agere to act.] 1. Having the power or quality of acting; causing change; communicating action or motion; acting; -- opposed to passive, that receives; as, certain active principles; the powers of the mind. 2. Quick in physical movement; of an agile and vigorous body; nimble; as, an active child or animal. Active and nervous was his gait. --Wordsworth. 3. In action; actually proceeding; working; in force; -- opposed to quiescent, dormant, or extinct; as, active laws; active hostilities; an active volcano. 4. Given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; -- opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal. 5. Requiring or implying action or exertion; -- opposed to sedentary or to tranquil; as, active employment or service; active scenes. 6. Given to action rather than contemplation; practical; operative; -- opposed to speculative or theoretical; as, an active rather than a speculative statesman. 7. Brisk; lively; as, an active demand for corn. 8. Implying or producing rapid action; as, an active disease; an active remedy. 9. (Gram.) (a) Applied to a form of the verb; -- opposed to passive. See Active voice, under Voice. (b) Applied to verbs which assert that the subject acts upon or affects something else; transitive. (c) Applied to all verbs that express action as distinct from mere existence or state. Active capital, Active wealth, money, or property that may readily be converted into money. Syn: Agile; alert; brisk; vigorous; nimble; lively; quick; sprightly; prompt; energetic.
Axis of the Ionic capital
Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.
Blitum capitatum
Blite Blite (bl[imac]t), n. [L. blitum, Gr. bli`ton.] (Bot.) A genus of herbs (Blitum>) with a fleshy calyx. Blitum capitatum is the strawberry blite.
Capita
Caput Ca"put (k[=a]"p[u^]t), n.; pl. Capita (k[a^]p"[i^]*t[.a]). [L., the head.] 1. (Anat.) The head; also, a knoblike protuberance or capitulum. 2. The top or superior part of a thing. 3. (Eng.) The council or ruling body of the University of Cambridge prior to the constitution of 1856. Your caputs and heads of colleges. --Lamb. Caput mortuum. [L., dead head.] (Old Chem.) The residuum after distillation or sublimation; hence, worthless residue.
Capital
Capital Cap"i*tal, a. [F. capital, L. capitalis capital (in senses 1 & 2), fr. caput head. See Chief, and cf. Capital, n.] 1. Of or pertaining to the head. [Obs.] Needs must the Serpent now his capital bruise Expect with mortal pain. --Milton. 2. Having reference to, or involving, the forfeiture of the head or life; affecting life; punishable with death; as, capital trials; capital punishment. Many crimes that are capital among us. --Swift. To put to death a capital offender. --Milton. 3. First in importance; chief; principal. A capital article in religion --Atterbury. Whatever is capital and essential in Christianity. --I. Taylor. 4. Chief, in a political sense, as being the seat of the general government of a state or nation; as, Washington and Paris are capital cities. 5. Of first rate quality; excellent; as, a capital speech or song. [Colloq.]
Capital letter
Capital letter [F, lettre capitale] (Print.), a leading or heading letter, used at the beginning of a sentence and as the first letter of certain words, distinguished, for the most part, both by different form and larger size, from the small (lower-case) letters, which form the greater part of common print or writing. Small capital letters have the form of capital letters and height of the body of the lower-case letters. Capital stock, money, property, or stock invested in any business, or the enterprise of any corporation or institution. --Abbott. Syn: Chief; leading; controlling; prominent.
Capital stock
Capital letter [F, lettre capitale] (Print.), a leading or heading letter, used at the beginning of a sentence and as the first letter of certain words, distinguished, for the most part, both by different form and larger size, from the small (lower-case) letters, which form the greater part of common print or writing. Small capital letters have the form of capital letters and height of the body of the lower-case letters. Capital stock, money, property, or stock invested in any business, or the enterprise of any corporation or institution. --Abbott. Syn: Chief; leading; controlling; prominent.
Capitalist
Capitalist Cap"i*tal*ist, n. [Cf. F. capitaliste.] One who has capital; one who has money for investment, or money invested; esp. a person of large property, which is employed in business. The expenditure of the capitalist. --Burke.
Capitalization
Capitalization Cap"i*tal*i*za`tion, n. The act or process of capitalizing.
Capitalize
Capitalize Cap"i*tal*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Capitalized; p. pr. & vb. n. Capitalizing.] 1. To convert into capital, or to use as capital. 2. To compute, appraise, or assess the capital value of (a patent right, an annuity, etc.) 3. To print in capital letters, or with an initial capital.
Capitalized
Capitalize Cap"i*tal*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Capitalized; p. pr. & vb. n. Capitalizing.] 1. To convert into capital, or to use as capital. 2. To compute, appraise, or assess the capital value of (a patent right, an annuity, etc.) 3. To print in capital letters, or with an initial capital.
Capitalizing
Capitalize Cap"i*tal*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Capitalized; p. pr. & vb. n. Capitalizing.] 1. To convert into capital, or to use as capital. 2. To compute, appraise, or assess the capital value of (a patent right, an annuity, etc.) 3. To print in capital letters, or with an initial capital.
Capitally
Capitally Cap*i*tal*ly, adv. 1. In a way involving the forfeiture of the head or life; as, to punish capitally. 2. In a capital manner; excellently. [Colloq.]
Capitalness
Capitalness Cap"i*tal*ness, n. The quality of being capital; preeminence. [R.]
Capitan Pasha
Capitan Pasha Ca`pi*tan` Pa*sha` or Pacha Pa*cha` [See capitan.] The chief admiral of the Turkish fleet.
Capitate
Capitate Cap"i*tate, a. [L. capitatus fr. caput head.] 1. Headlike in form; also, having the distal end enlarged and rounded, as the stigmas of certain flowers. 2. (Bot.) Having the flowers gathered into a head.
Capitatim
Capitatim Cap`i*ta"tim, a. [NL.] Of so much per head; as, a capitatim tax; a capitatim grant.
Capitation
Capitation Cap`i*ta"tion, n. [L. capitatio a poll tax, fr. caput head; cf. F. capitation.] 1. A numbering of heads or individuals. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne. 2. A tax upon each head or person, without reference to property; a poll tax.
Capite
Capite Cap"i*te, n. [L., abl. of caput head.] See under Tenant.
Capitellate
Capitellate Cap`i*tel"late, a. [L. capitellum, dim. of caput head.] (Bot.) Having a very small knoblike termination, or collected into minute capitula.
Capitibranchiata
Tubicolae Tu*bic"o*l[ae], n. pl. [L. tubus a tube + colere to inhabit.] (Zo["o]l.) A division of annelids including those which construct, and habitually live in, tubes. The head or anterior segments usually bear gills and cirri. Called also Sedentaria, and Capitibranchiata. See Serpula, and Sabella.
Capitibranchiata
Capitibranchiata Cap`i*ti*bran`chi*a"ta, n. pl. [NL., from L. caput, capitis, head + -branchiae gills.] (Zo["o]l.) A division of annelids in which the gills arise from or near the head. See Tubicola.
Capitol
Capitol Cap"i*tol, [L. capitolium, fr. caput head: cf. F. capitole. See Chief.] 1. The temple of Jupiter, at Rome, on the Mona Capitolinus, where the Senate met. Comes C[ae]sar to the Capitol to-morrow? --Shak. 2. The edifice at Washington occupied by the Congress of the United States; also, the building in which the legislature of State holds its sessions; a statehouse.
Capitolian
Capitolian Cap`i*to"li*an, Capitoline Cap"i*to*line, a. [L. capitolinus: cf. F. capitolin.] Of or pertaining to the Capitol in Rome. ``Capitolian Jove.' --Macaulay. Capitoline games (Antiq.), annual games instituted at Rome by Camillus, in honor of Jupter Capitolinus, on account of the preservation of the Capitol from the Gauls; when reinstituted by Domitian, arter a period of neglect, they were held every fifth year.
Capitoline
Capitolian Cap`i*to"li*an, Capitoline Cap"i*to*line, a. [L. capitolinus: cf. F. capitolin.] Of or pertaining to the Capitol in Rome. ``Capitolian Jove.' --Macaulay. Capitoline games (Antiq.), annual games instituted at Rome by Camillus, in honor of Jupter Capitolinus, on account of the preservation of the Capitol from the Gauls; when reinstituted by Domitian, arter a period of neglect, they were held every fifth year.
Capitoline games
Capitolian Cap`i*to"li*an, Capitoline Cap"i*to*line, a. [L. capitolinus: cf. F. capitolin.] Of or pertaining to the Capitol in Rome. ``Capitolian Jove.' --Macaulay. Capitoline games (Antiq.), annual games instituted at Rome by Camillus, in honor of Jupter Capitolinus, on account of the preservation of the Capitol from the Gauls; when reinstituted by Domitian, arter a period of neglect, they were held every fifth year.
Capitula
Capitula Ca*pit"u*la, n. pl. See Capitulum.
Capitular
Capitular Ca*pit"u*lar, n. [LL. capitulare, capitularium, fr. L. capitulum a small head, a chapter, dim. of capit head, chapter.] 1. An act passed in a chapter. 2. A member of a chapter. The chapter itself, and all its members or capitulars. --Ayliffe. 3. The head or prominent part.
Capitular
Capitular Ca*pit"u*lar, a. 1. (Eccl.) Of or pertaining to a chapter; capitulary. From the pope to the member of the capitular body. --Milman. 2. (Bot.) Growing in, or pertaining to, a capitulum. 3. (Anat.) Pertaining to a capitulum; as, the capitular process of a vertebra, the process which articulates with the capitulum of a rib.
Capitularly
Capitularly Ca*pit"u*lar*ly, adv. In the manner or form of an ecclesiastical chapter. --Sterne.

Meaning of capit from wikipedia

- de minimis is a latin expression meaning about minimal things, normally in the locutions de minimis non curat praetor ('the praetor does not concern himself
- (spanish: premios tato) are argentine awards for television, released by the capit (cámara argentina de productoras independientes de televisión). the award
- dabunt, captiuis fata triumphum. sed iam serpentum maior concordia. non capit has nugas humilis domus. --xxi the “cadaver society” is a secret society
- etymology derives from the latin latin: capitātus, 'having a head,' from latin: capit-, meaning 'head.' position of capitate bone (shown in red). left
- in the monumenta germaniae historica (ed. a. boretius and v. krause, mgh capit. 2, no. 253). the do****ent takes its name from raffelstetten, a toll-bar
- orational, also known as the libellus orationum (verona, cathedral, biblioteca capit. cod. l****ix), is a late 7th or early 8th century visigothic prayer book
- 3, 8; justin. xxiii. 1. liv. epit. xii.; fast. capit. dionys. xx. fr. mai and didot; fast. capit.; zonar. viii. 6. liv. xxii. 61. id. xxiii. 20,
- hesius, emblemata sacra de fide, spe, charitate. in the emblem, 'capit quod non capit', a winged boy, a symbol of the soul, is shown holding a sphere reflecting