Definition of arrier. Meaning of arrier. Synonyms of arrier

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Definition of arrier

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Arriere
Arriere Ar*riere", n. [F. arri[`e]re. See Arrear.] ``That which is behind'; the rear; -- chiefly used as an adjective in the sense of behind, rear, subordinate. Arriere fee, Arriere fief, a fee or fief dependent on a superior fee, or a fee held of a feudatory. Arriere vassal, the vassal of a vassal.
Arriere fee
Arriere Ar*riere", n. [F. arri[`e]re. See Arrear.] ``That which is behind'; the rear; -- chiefly used as an adjective in the sense of behind, rear, subordinate. Arriere fee, Arriere fief, a fee or fief dependent on a superior fee, or a fee held of a feudatory. Arriere vassal, the vassal of a vassal.
Arriere fief
Arriere Ar*riere", n. [F. arri[`e]re. See Arrear.] ``That which is behind'; the rear; -- chiefly used as an adjective in the sense of behind, rear, subordinate. Arriere fee, Arriere fief, a fee or fief dependent on a superior fee, or a fee held of a feudatory. Arriere vassal, the vassal of a vassal.
Arriere vassal
Arriere Ar*riere", n. [F. arri[`e]re. See Arrear.] ``That which is behind'; the rear; -- chiefly used as an adjective in the sense of behind, rear, subordinate. Arriere fee, Arriere fief, a fee or fief dependent on a superior fee, or a fee held of a feudatory. Arriere vassal, the vassal of a vassal.
Arriere-ban
Arriere-ban Ar*riere"-ban`, n. [F., fr. OE. arban, heriban, fr. OHG. hariban, heriban, G. heerbann, the calling together of an army; OHG. heri an army + ban a public call or order. The French have misunderstood their old word, and have changed it into arri[`e]re-ban, though arri[`e]re has no connection with its proper meaning. See Ban, Abandon.] A proclamation, as of the French kings, calling not only their immediate feudatories, but the vassals of these feudatories, to take the field for war; also, the body of vassals called or liable to be called to arms, as in ancient France.
barrier reefs
Coral Cor"al, n. [Of. coral, F, corail, L. corallum, coralium, fr. Gr. kora`llion.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The hard parts or skeleton of various Anthozoa, and of a few Hydrozoa. Similar structures are also formed by some Bryozoa. Note: The large stony corals forming coral reefs belong to various genera of Madreporaria, and to the hydroid genus, Millepora. The red coral, used in jewelry, is the stony axis of the stem of a gorgonian (Corallium rubrum) found chiefly in the Mediterranean. The fan corals, plume corals, and sea feathers are species of Gorgoniacea, in which the axis is horny. Organ-pipe coral is formed by the genus Tubipora, an Alcyonarian, and black coral is in part the axis of species of the genus Antipathes. See Anthozoa, Madrepora. 2. The ovaries of a cooked lobster; -- so called from their color. 3. A piece of coral, usually fitted with small bells and other appurtenances, used by children as a plaything. Brain coral, or Brain stone coral. See under Brain. Chain coral. See under Chain. Coral animal (Zo["o]l.), one of the polyps by which corals are formed. They are often very erroneously called coral insects. Coral fish. See in the Vocabulary. Coral reefs (Phys. Geog.), reefs, often of great extent, made up chiefly of fragments of corals, coral sands, and the solid limestone resulting from their consolidation. They are classed as fringing reefs, when they border the land; barrier reefs, when separated from the shore by a broad belt of water; atolls, when they constitute separate islands, usually inclosing a lagoon. See Atoll. Coral root (Bot.), a genus (Corallorhiza) of orchideous plants, of a yellowish or brownish red color, parasitic on roots of other plants, and having curious jointed or knotted roots not unlike some kinds of coral. See Illust. under Coralloid. Coral snake. (Zo) (a) A small, venomous, Brazilian snake (Elaps corallinus), coral-red, with black bands. (b) A small, harmless, South American snake (Tortrix scytale). Coral tree (Bot.), a tropical, leguminous plant, of several species, with showy, scarlet blossoms and coral-red seeds. The best known is Erythrina Corallodendron. Coral wood, a hard, red cabinet wood. --McElrath.
Carrier
Carrier Car"ri*er, n. [From Carry.] 1. One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger. The air which is but . . . a carrier of the sounds. --Bacon. 2. One who is employed, or makes it his business, to carry goods for others for hire; a porter; a teamster. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. --Swift. 3. (Mach.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel. Carrier pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the domestic pigeon used to convey letters from a distant point to to its home. Carrier shell (Zo["o]l.), a univalve shell of the genus Phorus; -- so called because it fastens bits of stones and broken shells to its own shell, to such an extent as almost to conceal it. Common carrier (Law.) See under Common, a.
Carrier pigeon
Carrier Car"ri*er, n. [From Carry.] 1. One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger. The air which is but . . . a carrier of the sounds. --Bacon. 2. One who is employed, or makes it his business, to carry goods for others for hire; a porter; a teamster. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. --Swift. 3. (Mach.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel. Carrier pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the domestic pigeon used to convey letters from a distant point to to its home. Carrier shell (Zo["o]l.), a univalve shell of the genus Phorus; -- so called because it fastens bits of stones and broken shells to its own shell, to such an extent as almost to conceal it. Common carrier (Law.) See under Common, a.
carrier pigeons
Dove Dove, n. [OE. dove, duve, douve, AS. d?fe; akin to OS. d?ba, D. duif, OHG. t?ba, G. taube, Icel. d?fa, Sw. dufva, Dan. due, Goth. d?b?; perh. from the root of E. dive.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A pigeon of the genus Columba and various related genera. The species are numerous. Note: The domestic dove, including the varieties called fantails, tumblers, carrier pigeons, etc., was derived from the rock pigeon (Columba livia) of Europe and Asia; the turtledove of Europe, celebrated for its sweet, plaintive note, is C. turtur or Turtur vulgaris; the ringdove, the largest of European species, is C. palumbus; the Carolina dove, or Mourning dove, is Zenaidura macroura; the sea dove is the little auk (Mergulus alle or Alle alle). See Turtledove, Ground dove, and Rock pigeon. The dove is a symbol of innocence, gentleness, and affection; also, in art and in the Scriptures, the typical symbol of the Holy Ghost.
Carrier shell
Carrier Car"ri*er, n. [From Carry.] 1. One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger. The air which is but . . . a carrier of the sounds. --Bacon. 2. One who is employed, or makes it his business, to carry goods for others for hire; a porter; a teamster. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. --Swift. 3. (Mach.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel. Carrier pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the domestic pigeon used to convey letters from a distant point to to its home. Carrier shell (Zo["o]l.), a univalve shell of the genus Phorus; -- so called because it fastens bits of stones and broken shells to its own shell, to such an extent as almost to conceal it. Common carrier (Law.) See under Common, a.
Common carrier
Carrier Car"ri*er, n. [From Carry.] 1. One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger. The air which is but . . . a carrier of the sounds. --Bacon. 2. One who is employed, or makes it his business, to carry goods for others for hire; a porter; a teamster. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. --Swift. 3. (Mach.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel. Carrier pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the domestic pigeon used to convey letters from a distant point to to its home. Carrier shell (Zo["o]l.), a univalve shell of the genus Phorus; -- so called because it fastens bits of stones and broken shells to its own shell, to such an extent as almost to conceal it. Common carrier (Law.) See under Common, a.
Farrier
Farrier Far"ri*er, v. i. To practice as a farrier; to carry on the trade of a farrier. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
Farrier
Farrier Far"ri*er, n. [OE. farrour, ferrer, OF. ferreor, ferrier, LL. Ferrator, ferrarius equorum, from ferrare to shoe a horse, ferrum a horseshoe, fr. L. ferrum iron. Cf. Ferreous.] 1. A shoer of horses; a veterinary surgeon.
Farriery
Farriery Far"ri*er*y, n. 1. The art of shoeing horses. 2. The art of preventing, curing, or mitigating diseases of horses and cattle; the veterinary art. 3. The place where a smith shoes horses.
Harrier
Harrier Har"ri*er, n. [From Hare, n.] (Zo["o]l.) One of a small breed of hounds, used for hunting hares. [Written also harier.]
Harrier
Harrier Har"ri*er, n. [From Harry.] 1. One who harries. 2. (Zo["o]l.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus [ae]runginosus), and the hen harrier (C. cyaneus). Harrier hawk(?), one of several species of American hawks of the genus Micrastur.
Harrier hawk
Harrier Har"ri*er, n. [From Harry.] 1. One who harries. 2. (Zo["o]l.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus [ae]runginosus), and the hen harrier (C. cyaneus). Harrier hawk(?), one of several species of American hawks of the genus Micrastur.
Hen harrier
Hen Hen, n. [AS. henn, hen, h[ae]n; akin to D. hen, OHG. henna, G. henne, Icel. h?na, Dan. h["o]na; the fem. corresponding to AS. hana cock, D. haan, OHG. hano, G. hahn, Icel. hani, Dan. & Sw. hane. Prob. akin to L. canere to sing, and orig. meaning, a singer. Cf. Chanticleer.] (Zo["o]l.) The female of the domestic fowl; also, the female of grouse, pheasants, or any kind of birds; as, the heath hen; the gray hen. Note: Used adjectively or in combination to indicate the female; as, hen canary, hen eagle, hen turkey, peahen. Hen clam. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A clam of the Mactra, and allied genera; the sea clam or surf clam. See Surf clam. (b) A California clam of the genus Pachydesma. Hen driver. See Hen harrier (below). Hen harrier (Zo["o]l.), a hawk (Circus cyaneus), found in Europe and America; -- called also dove hawk, henharm, henharrow, hen driver, and usually, in America, marsh hawk. See Marsh hawk. Hen hawk (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of large hawks which capture hens; esp., the American red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis), the red-shouldered hawk (B. lineatus), and the goshawk.
Marrier
Marrier Mar"ri*er, n. One who marries.
Quarrier
Quarrier Quar"ri*er, n. A worker in a stone quarry.
Tarrier
Tarrier Tar"ri*er, n. One who, or that which, tarries.
Tarrier
Tarrier Tar"ri*er, n. (Zo["o]l.) A kind of dig; a terrier. [Obs.]

Meaning of arrier from wikipedia

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- the h.a.v.o.c. (h eavy a rticulated v ehicle o rdnance c arrier) was introduced in 1986, and came packaged with the cross-country action