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Definition of Metal. Meaning of Metal. Synonyms of Metal

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Definition of Metal

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Alkaline metals
Alkaline Al"ka*line (?; 277), a. [Cf. F. alcalin.] Of or pertaining to an alkali or to alkalies; having the properties of an alkali. Alkaline earths, certain substances, as lime, baryta, strontia, and magnesia, possessing some of the qualities of alkalies. Alkaline metals, potassium, sodium, c[ae]sium, lithium, rubidium. Alkaline reaction, a reaction indicating alkalinity, as by the action on limits, turmeric, etc.
Babbitt metal
Babbitt metal Bab"bitt met`al [From the inventor, Isaac Babbitt of Massachusetts.] A soft white alloy of variable composition (as a nine parts of tin to one of copper, or of fifty parts of tin to five of antimony and one of copper) used in bearings to diminish friction.
Bath metal
Bath Bath, n. A city in the west of England, resorted to for its hot springs, which has given its name to various objects. Bath brick, a preparation of calcareous earth, in the form of a brick, used for cleaning knives, polished metal, etc. Bath chair, a kind of chair on wheels, as used by invalids at Bath. ``People walked out, or drove out, or were pushed out in their Bath chairs.' --Dickens. Bath metal, an alloy consisting of four and a half ounces of zinc and one pound of copper. Bath note, a folded writing paper, 8 1/2 by 14 inches. Bath stone, a species of limestone (o["o]lite) found near Bath, used for building.
Bell metal
Bell metal Bell" met`al A hard alloy or bronze, consisting usually of about three parts of copper to one of tin; -- used for making bells. Bell metal ore, a sulphide of tin, copper, and iron; the mineral stannite.
Bell metal ore
Bell metal Bell" met`al A hard alloy or bronze, consisting usually of about three parts of copper to one of tin; -- used for making bells. Bell metal ore, a sulphide of tin, copper, and iron; the mineral stannite.
Bimetallic
Bimetallic Bi"me*tal"lic, a. Composed of two different metals; formed of two parts, each of a different metal; as, bimetallic wire; bimetallic thermometer, etc.
Bimetallist
Bimetallist Bi*met"al*list, n. An advocate of bimetallism.
Blond metal
Blond metal Blond" met`al A variety of clay ironstone, in Staffordshire, England, used for making tools.
Britannia metal
Britannia Bri*tan"ni*a, n. [From L. Britannia Great Britain.] A white-metal alloy of tin, antimony, bismuth, copper, etc. It somewhat resembles silver, and is used for table ware. Called also Britannia metal.
Cannon metal
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
coarse metal
Matte Matte, n. [F. matte; cf. F. mat, masc., matte, fem., faint, dull, dim; -- said of metals. See Mate checkmate.] 1. (Metallurgy) A partly reduced copper sulphide, obtained by alternately roasting and melting copper ore in separating the metal from associated iron ores, and called coarse metal, fine metal, etc., according to the grade of fineness. On the exterior it is dark brown or black, but on a fresh surface is yellow or bronzy in color. 2. A dead or dull finish, as in gilding where the gold leaf is not burnished, or in painting where the surface is purposely deprived of gloss.
Composition metal
Composition Com`po*si"tion, n. [F. composition, fr. L. compositio. See Composite.] 1. The act or art of composing, or forming a whole or integral, by placing together and uniting different things, parts, or ingredients. In specific uses: (a) The invention or combination of the parts of any literary work or discourse, or of a work of art; as, the composition of a poem or a piece of music. ``The constant habit of elaborate composition.' --Macaulay. (b) (Fine Arts) The art or practice of so combining the different parts of a work of art as to produce a harmonious whole; also, a work of art considered as such. See 4, below. (c) The act of writing for practice in a language, as English, Latin, German, etc. (d) (Print.) The setting up of type and arranging it for printing. 2. The state of being put together or composed; conjunction; combination; adjustment. View them in composition with other things. --I. Watts. The elementary composition of bodies. --Whewell. 3. A mass or body formed by combining two or more substances; as, a chemical composition. A composition that looks . . . like marble. --Addison. 4. A literary, musical, or artistic production, especially one showing study and care in arrangement; -- often used of an elementary essay or translation done as an educational exercise. 5. Consistency; accord; congruity. [Obs.] There is no composition in these news That gives them credit. --Shak. 6. Mutual agreement to terms or conditions for the settlement of a difference or controversy; also, the terms or conditions of settlement; agreement. Thus we are agreed: I crave our composition may be written. --Shak. 7. (Law) The adjustment of a debt, or avoidance of an obligation, by some form of compensation agreed on between the parties; also, the sum or amount of compensation agreed upon in the adjustment. Compositions for not taking the order of knighthood. --Hallam. Cleared by composition with their creditors. --Blackstone. 8. Synthesis as opposed to analysis. The investigation of difficult things by the method of analysis ought ever to precede the method of composition. --Sir I. Newton. Composition cloth, a kind of cloth covered with a preparation making it waterproof. Composition deed, an agreement for composition between a debtor and several creditors. Composition plane (Crystallog.), the plane by which the two individuals of a twin crystal are united in their reserved positions. Composition of forces (Mech.), the finding of a single force (called the resultant) which shall be equal in effect to two or more given forces (called the components) when acting in given directions. --Herbert. Composition metal, an alloy resembling brass, which is sometimes used instead of copper for sheathing vessels; -- also called Muntz metal and yellow metal. Composition of proportion (Math.), an arrangement of four proportionals so that the sum of the first and second is to the second as the sum of the third and fourth to the fourth.
Dutch metal
Tombac Tom"bac, n. [Pg. tambaca,tambaque, fr. Malay tamb[=a]ga copper; cf. Skr. t[=a]mraka; cf. F. tombac.] (Metal.) An alloy of copper and zinc, resembling brass, and containing about 84 per cent of copper; -- called also German, or Dutch, brass. It is very malleable and ductile, and when beaten into thin leaves is sometimes called Dutch metal. The addition of arsenic makes white tombac. [Written also tombak, and tambac.]
Dutch metal
touto. The English have applied the name especially to the Germanic people living nearest them, the Hollanders. Cf. Derrick, Teutonic.] Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants. Dutch auction. See under Auction. Dutch cheese, a small, pound, hard cheese, made from skim milk. Dutch clinker, a kind of brick made in Holland. It is yellowish, very hard, and long and narrow in shape. Dutch clover (Bot.), common white clover (Trifolium repens), the seed of which was largely imported into England from Holland. Dutch concert, a so-called concert in which all the singers sing at the same time different songs. [Slang] Dutch courage, the courage of partial intoxication. [Slang] --Marryat. Dutch door, a door divided into two parts, horizontally, so arranged that the lower part can be shut and fastened, while the upper part remains open. Dutch foil, Dutch leaf, or Dutch gold, a kind of brass rich in copper, rolled or beaten into thin sheets, used in Holland to ornament toys and paper; -- called also Dutch mineral, Dutch metal, brass foil, and bronze leaf. Dutch liquid (Chem.), a thin, colorless, volatile liquid, C2H4Cl2, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor, produced by the union of chlorine and ethylene or olefiant gas; -- called also Dutch oil. It is so called because discovered (in 1795) by an association of four Hollandish chemists. See Ethylene, and Olefiant.
Electro-metallurgy
Electro-metallurgy E*lec`tro-met"al*lur`gy, n. The act or art precipitating a metal electro-chemical action, by which a coating is deposited, on a prepared surface, as in electroplating and electrotyping; galvanoplasty.
Experimetalist
Experimetalist Ex*per`i*me"tal*ist, n. One who makes experiments; an experimenter. --Whaterly.
fine metal
Matte Matte, n. [F. matte; cf. F. mat, masc., matte, fem., faint, dull, dim; -- said of metals. See Mate checkmate.] 1. (Metallurgy) A partly reduced copper sulphide, obtained by alternately roasting and melting copper ore in separating the metal from associated iron ores, and called coarse metal, fine metal, etc., according to the grade of fineness. On the exterior it is dark brown or black, but on a fresh surface is yellow or bronzy in color. 2. A dead or dull finish, as in gilding where the gold leaf is not burnished, or in painting where the surface is purposely deprived of gloss.
Fusible metal
Fusible Fu"si*ble, a. [F. fusible. See Fuse, v. t.] CapabIe of being melted or liquefied. Fusible metal, any alloy of different metals capable of being easily fused, especially an alloy of five parts of bismuth, three of lead, and two of tin, which melts at a temperature below that of boiling water. --Ure. Fusible plug (Steam Boiler), a piece of easily fusible alloy, placed in one of the sheets and intended to melt and blow off the steam in case of low water.
Gilding metal
Guilding Guild"ing, n. 1. The art or practice of overlaying or covering with gold leaf; also, a thin coating or wash of gold, or of that which resembles gold. 2. Gold in leaf, powder, or liquid, for application to any surface. 3. Any superficial coating or appearance, as opposed to what is solid and genuine. Gilding metal, a tough kind of sheet brass from which cartridge shells are made.
Heavy metal
Heavy Heav"y, a. [Compar. Heavier; superl. Heaviest.] [OE. hevi, AS. hefig, fr. hebban to lift, heave; akin to OHG. hebig, hevig, Icel. h["o]figr, h["o]fugr. See Heave.] 1. Heaved or lifted with labor; not light; weighty; ponderous; as, a heavy stone; hence, sometimes, large in extent, quantity, or effects; as, a heavy fall of rain or snow; a heavy failure; heavy business transactions, etc.; often implying strength; as, a heavy barrier; also, difficult to move; as, a heavy draught. 2. Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive; hard to endure or accomplish; hence, grievous, afflictive; as, heavy yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc. The hand of the Lord was heavy upon them of Ashdod. --1 Sam. v. 6. The king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make. --Shak. Sent hither to impart the heavy news. --Wordsworth. Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence. --Shak. 3. Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with care, grief, pain, disappointment. The heavy [sorrowing] nobles all in council were. --Chapman. A light wife doth make a heavy husband. --Shak. 4. Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid; as, a heavy gait, looks, manners, style, and the like; a heavy writer or book. Whilst the heavy plowman snores. --Shak. Of a heavy, dull, degenerate mind. --Dryden. Neither [is] his ear heavy, that it can not hear. --Is. lix. 1. 5. Strong; violent; forcible; as, a heavy sea, storm, cannonade, and the like. 6. Loud; deep; -- said of sound; as, heavy thunder. But, hark! that heavy sound breaks in once more. --Byron. 7. Dark with clouds, or ready to rain; gloomy; -- said of the sky. 8. Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey; -- said of earth; as, a heavy road, soil, and the like. 9. Not raised or made light; as, heavy bread. 10. Not agreeable to, or suitable for, the stomach; not easily digested; -- said of food. 11. Having much body or strength; -- said of wines, or other liquors. 12. With child; pregnant. [R.] Heavy artillery. (Mil.) (a) Guns of great weight or large caliber, esp. siege, garrison, and seacoast guns. (b) Troops which serve heavy guns. Heavy cavalry. See under Cavalry. Heavy fire (Mil.), a continuous or destructive cannonading, or discharge of small arms. Heavy metal (Mil.), large guns carrying balls of a large size; also, large balls for such guns.
Heavy metals
Heavy metals. (Chem.) See under Metal. Heavy weight, in wrestling, boxing, etc., a term applied to the heaviest of the classes into which contestants are divided. Cf. Feather weight (c), under Feather. Note: Heavy is used in composition to form many words which need no special explanation; as, heavy-built, heavy-browed, heavy-gaited, etc.
Hydrometallurgical
Hydrometallurgical Hy`dro*met`al*lur"gic*al, a. Of or pertaining to hydrometallurgy; involving the use of liquid reagents in the treatment or reduction of ores. -- Hy`dro*met`al*lur"gic*al*ly, adv.
Hydrometallurgically
Hydrometallurgical Hy`dro*met`al*lur"gic*al, a. Of or pertaining to hydrometallurgy; involving the use of liquid reagents in the treatment or reduction of ores. -- Hy`dro*met`al*lur"gic*al*ly, adv.
Hydrometallurgy
Hydrometallurgy Hy`dro*met"al*lur`gy, n. [Hydro-, 1 + metallurgy.] The art or process of assaying or reducing ores by means of liquid reagents.
Kingston metal
Kingston metal King"ston met"al An alloy of tin, copper, and mercury, sometimes used for the bearings and packings of machinery. --McElrath.
Marine metal
Marine engine (Mech.), a steam engine for propelling a vessel. Marine glue. See under Glue. Marine insurance, insurance against the perils of the sea, including also risks of fire, piracy, and barratry. Marine interest, interest at any rate agreed on for money lent upon respondentia and bottomry bonds. Marine law. See under Law. Marine league, three geographical miles. Marine metal, an alloy of lead, antimony, and mercury, made for sheathing ships. --Mc Elrath. Marine soap, cocoanut oil soap; -- so called because, being quite soluble in salt water, it is much used on shipboard. Marine store, a store where old canvas, ropes, etc., are bought and sold; a junk shop. [Eng.]
Metalammonium
Metalammonium Met`al*am*mo"ni*um, n. [Metal + ammonium.] (Chem.) A hypothetical radical derived from ammonium by the substitution of metallic atoms in place of hydrogen.
Metalbumin
Metalbumin Met`al*bu"min, n. [Pref. met- + albumin.] (Physiol. Chem.) A form of albumin found in ascitic and certain serous fluids. It is sometimes regarded as a mixture of albumin and mucin.
Metaldehyde
Metaldehyde Me*tal"de*hyde, n. [Pref. met- + aldehyde.] (Chem.) A white crystalline substance isomeric with, and obtained from, acetic aldehyde by polymerization, and reconvertible into the same.
Metalepses
Metalepsis Met`a*lep"sis, n.; pl. Metalepses. [L., fr. Gr. ? participation, alteration, fr. ? to partake, to take in exchange; ? beyond + ? to take.] (Rhet.) The continuation of a trope in one word through a succession of significations, or the union of two or more tropes of a different kind in one word.

Meaning of Metal from wikipedia

- metallic materials. for other uses, see metal (disambiguation). a metal (from gr**** μέταλλον métallon, 'mine, quarry, metal') is a material (an element, compound" timestamp="2016-12-26t02:41:19z" />